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Glen Grant 1953 / Bottled 2013 / Gordon & Macphail

Flabbergasting!

3 1093

@markjedi1Review by @markjedi1

7th Sep 2017

1

  • Nose
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  • Taste
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  • Finish
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  • Balance
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  • Overall
    93

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Originally, Gordon & Macphail released this Glen Grant 1953 in 2013. It matured for no less than 60 years. It is a vatting of 3 casks that yielded 517 bottles. On the 4th September 2017 Gordon & Macphail announced the exclusive Glen Grant Collection, containing 6 Glen Grant vintages from 1950 through 1955. This is the fourth bottle in that bespoke collection. Only 75 of these oak treasure chests were created. I received the sample through G&M.

Oh, my! Another one of those amazingly fruity noses on juicy, tropical fruit like pineapple and orange marmalade, hints of nuts, beeswax, marzipan, overripe banana, freshly squeezed orange juice, sap of pine trees and apple sauce. Succulent is an understatement. Add some vanilla and a hint of cocoa. Lest we forget: some menthol! This is simply flabbergasting!

Good body, lovely spiciness, but it is the fruity nature of this malt that makes it absolutely stunning on the palate. All the fruit from the nose and more, upholstered by a feisty touch of ginger and white pepper. Woodsmoke appears, making it very much like the 1950, but just a tad brighter.

The finish is long and fruity with the emphasis on juicy oranges.

Oh, boy, oh, boy… I’m at a loss for words. Another one for my top ten. What a feast. Around 2.400 EUR.

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10 comments

@Georgy
Georgy commented

That sounds mouthwatering. Do you think it was matured in some old beaten up abused casks? That much time in a fresh cask, I assume, would make this overly oaky and immensely intense. That's my guess, though. Would love to know your opinion on older whiskies and the casks they use to mature them in! I personally think that the more tired a cask is, the more it is likely to be used for longer maturation.

2 months ago 2Who liked this?

@paddockjudge
paddockjudge commented

@Georgy,

old cask are like old people, they don't get tired, they just take longer to get somewhere.

2 months ago 0

@Georgy
Georgy commented

@paddockjudge oh, old people do get tired alright ) but that's a nice way of saying it

2 months ago 2Who liked this?

@markjedi1
markjedi1 commented

Truth be told, I would not know. Some of these old sherry cask are simply marvelous and certainly not 'abused' or 'tired'. They might very well have been old casks, though, that had held sherry for a very long time. But like I said, I would not know. I do realize that fresh casks can be quite spicy and overpowering, but that does not seem to be the case with these old Glen Grant releases.

2 months ago 2Who liked this?

@MadSingleMalt
MadSingleMalt commented

As far as the original sherry maturation, don't those sherry houses deliberately choose "sleepy" casks so they can mature the sherry for a very long time without contributing much oak? I think I've heard that a few times.

2 months ago 1Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor commented

Great review title. And it sounds like a wonderful whisky experience.

2 months ago 0

@Georgy
Georgy commented

@markjedi1 I see) can only get access to such ancient and rare whiskies at whisky festivals, but even then their samples can be pricey, especially the rock stars like Brora and Port Ellen ) so I'm jealous (in a good way). Such a delicious description !)

2 months ago 0

@paddockjudge
paddockjudge commented

@markjedi1, thanks for sharing! This one must have shook you to your core, you scored it 93!

@Georgy, I hope you don't get tired of discussing old casks...they just keep giving...

2 months ago 0

@markjedi1
markjedi1 commented

@paddockjudge Like I said: it stumbled into my personal top ten, so... yes, this was amazing.

2 months ago 0

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