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Longrow CV

Peathead Revisited

1 1588

RReview by @Rigmorole

18th May 2014

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  • Nose
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  • Overall
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I feel a bit sad that this scotch is fading into the yester'sphere. It grew on me over time. Parting is such peaty sorrow.

Here are the final tweaks on my tasting notes:

Nose--Grass fire, hay, reptile musk, lovely hint of peat, virgin olive oil, ash, peppermint.

Palate--A very unconventional exchange: Lemon, pan fried rattle snake, mesquite smoke, anejo tequila, mescal, peaty goodness.

Finish--The oily and the spicy intertwine and then release with lingering peat and smoke, with a touch of oaken wood in there.

METAPHORICAL MUSINGS & MARGINALIA This whisky is a bit strange, although I have tasted tequila-like and/or mescal-like influences in other whiskies from time to time. Such overtones are not unheard of, certainly, but rare all the same.

The way tequila interacts with oak is different than the way scotch does--usually. In this case, with such a relatively young whisky that shouldn't have any wood flavor in it, there is some. Why? How? What?

I have to speculate that Springbank mixed in few funky oldish casks into the CV, along with a decidedly young Longrow. The grotty, sugary youth and burn is in there, but it has been mellowed by something that is magically unique and yet deliciously grimy, all the same.

Is the new white labeled Longrow Peated more consistent, producing a more expected end on the taste buds?

Yes, I should think so . . . and yet . . . sometimes the unexpected is worth trying, or even becoming accustomed to.

Over the past year, I have gone back a few times to the Longrow CV with better and better results. Like Oliver Onions' "beckoning fair one" of gothic literaria, L-Row CV has intoned my name through long, dark corridors of the soul.

Did I answer this Dark Passenger, you ask?

Hell, no. Never provoke a ghost, or a sociopathic scotch. If anyone sees you whispering into your glass, there's always the chance you could find yourself locked in a safe house with padded walls and nutters for company.

Suffice it to say that Longrow CV has an ethereal quality best appreciated without too much fuss and bother. It is an eerily strange dram, the sensory trappings of which might have been somewhat passable one hundred years ago, or might still be hundred years into the future . . . a Customer in Black, it is, that sits quietly in the corner of the pub, brooding like, sipping, brooding some more . . . that CIB SOB who comes in late when nobody seems to be watching, orders his drink from the bartender (who can't seem to recall serving him) and then somehow disappears right before last call, leaving the door open behind him, and his empty glass on the table.

In the case of the CV, I wish I had carried on a conversation with this "weird peat-head in the corner" . . . alas, it is gone, never to be purchased again.

Hear, hear: "The Longrow is dead, long live the Longrow."

"enough, or Too much!"

Signed, Yr. obt. servant Theobaldus of Tarland

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15 comments

@Ol_Jas
Ol_Jas commented

I can't watch youtube videos from work. Can you just give me a quick spoiler and tell me whether you mention the reptile musk?

5 years ago 0

@Ol_Jas
Ol_Jas commented

So I watched it. The reptile musk allusions are indeed plentiful.

5 years ago 0

@Ol_Jas
Ol_Jas commented

You talked in your video about its increasing scarcity. Binny's still has it and they (typically) deliver to whatever states allow it. $50. That's where I got mine a few months ago (still unopened, and will be until the fall when I'll line it up alongside the Longrow Red that's also sitting proudly in my stash and in my imagination).

5 years ago 0

Rigmorole commented

Let us know what you think of the red. Very cool

5 years ago 0

Rigmorole commented

OIJas, have you tried this: www.thewhiskyexchange.com/P-23287.aspx

I see you like the IB Ledaigs. I'm intrigued by this bottle. A friend is traveling to Scotland and I might have this bottle shipped to his hotel. I live in Portland, Oregon, USA. Another bottle that intrigues me because it may be a bit like the old Clynelishes/Broras is this one: www.thewhiskyexchange.com/P-24356.aspx It will be up shortly. W.E. just acquired it and they are putting it up for sale. Tasting notes up soon. Suffice it to say, I predict it will be lemony, farmy (manure, wet muddy pastures), with some cream, mustard, and a little industrial pique (acetone?). Just a guess.

5 years ago 0

@Ol_Jas
Ol_Jas commented

I haven't had either of those.

Realy, I've only ever had the OB Legaig 10, but you often hear good things about particular—and young, in most cases I remember—IBs. So if I run across one at a reasonable price to take the chance, I'll probably take it. I can't say I'll go to great lengths for them, at least not until I've had a mind-blower.

5 years ago 0

@Nock
Nock commented

I really loved this bottle and I'm sad it is being replaced with the new Red and White label which doesn't sound as peaty or as funky.

5 years ago 0

@Robert99
Robert99 commented

@Rigmorole can you tell me what reptile musk smells like. I myself get a ton of lemon grass and regular grass with something like, sorry to tell, piss with brine, salt and a very clean caramel ( not a smoky one). I had a Springbank 10 this spring with a rotten grass smell. It took more than a month for this rotten smell to fade a little. I do love that those scotches explore the herbal world more than the spice's world, but I am not sure I will go for them anymore. I hesitate because everything that I tasted from Springbank was released in 2013. So is the pungent and funky flavor of the 2013 part of the core of Springbank (Hazelburn and Longrow)?

5 years ago 0

Rigmorole commented

In my review, I speak of the taste of a reptile as well as the scent. As a young lad I handled more than my share of snakes. Garter snakes usually stunk to high heaven, but other varieties had a similar type of oil and that is what I'm talking about.

Mezcal and tequila do move a bit in that general direction but the CV has a lovely grottiness that is hard to pinpoint and so I used the reptile musk since that is what I was reminded of. I lived in an area with red clay soil and that also was carried on the snake's bellies. The oils help snakes to stay relatively clean despite crawling on their bellies. You can smell the scent in the reptile part of a zoo. It's there as well. In very low amounts it can be charming.

As for the taste of pan fried rattle snake that is quite different than the scent of a live one. I was attacked by a rattle snake outside of Cody Wyoming when I was a lad between sixth and seventh grades in school. My foreman at the ranch chopped off the head of the snake and gave me the rattle as a souvenier. It wasn't a very big snake and so the venom would have been quite dangerous had I been bitten. I encourage you to try rattlesnake if the opportunity ever presents itself. It is a very delicious meat indeed. Thankfully, I have one CV left. I will save it for some time before popping that cork.

5 years ago 0

Rigmorole commented

Of course, the reptile part of a zoo generally smells of reptile shit, so that might not give you the scent I was thinking of. I really cannot qualify it. One has to smell it in order to know that of which I speak. Thanks for your reply, Robert! Happy sipping!

5 years ago 0

@Ol_Jas
Ol_Jas commented

@rigmorole, it sounds like this bottle improved for you over the months that it was open. Yes? Or do you think you just grew to like it more?

I'm still sitting on my unopened stash bottle and I wonder whether I should just pop her open immediately to begin the shelf-aging process.

Thanks.

4 years ago 0

Rigmorole commented

I think it is best after about a quarter open with 4-6 mo in bottle like that

4 years ago 1Who liked this?

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