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Wiser's Dissertation

Seven Seeds of Rye

8 1188

@RianCReview by @RianC

12th Nov 2020

1

  • Nose
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  • Taste
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  • Finish
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  • Balance
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  • Overall
    88

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Distribution of ratings for this: brand user

This bottle was most kindly sent my way via the generosity of @cricklewood. Too kind, Sir! It's been open over ten months now and is about half full.

Now I could go into the specs of this whisky in a very detailed way and re-tell the genuinely very interesting tale of how this came to be. If you don't know, and want to know more, I'll add a link to a site that has all the information one could possibly want (torontowhiskysociety.ca/2017/05/…). In brief, the barrels laid down all helped Dr Don Livermore complete his phd in brewing and distilling and were then blended to form this bottle - hence the name. Clever, eh? Seriously, anyone who likes a graph and the minutiae of distilling should check out the link.

But for now, let's get to the really important stuff...

Nose - fresh, clean rye with some toasted new oak. Warming baking spices like cinnamon, clove and more toasted vanilla. A little heat and wood glue note - but it works - lots of caramel toffee and some fruity notes in the background, think red apple and cherries. I can see the Lot 40 connection but they're certainly not the same whisky.

Taste - nice thick mouth-feel, without being cloying, and with quite a buttery texture and feel - I like that. Much like the nose, with more vanilla, cinnamon, cherry and caramel - Maple candy, perhaps? A little peppery towards the finish.

Finish - medium to long with yet more cherry, cinnamon and some black tea at the death.

When first opened I'd add a splash of water but air has got this baby just where I I like it.

This is really good rye whisky and a fitting tribute to the Doc's hard, and very informative, work! I like the way the rye leads but is backed up by those lovely caramel and cherry notes. And I specifically want to add how the virgin oak here is just as it should be - present and contributing but without dominating the experience. Really good.

Thanks, big man!

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11 comments

@Nozinan
Nozinan commented

This remains one of my favourite Wiser's releases. A bit overshadowed by the W23 and Lot 40 CS (not the third ed.) but when more subtle flavours are wanted, this is a great one.

I see we gave it the same score, I haven't actually reached for mine in some time (last pour I recorded was Dec. 2018 - a sample for someone). I think I'm overdue.

16 days ago 3Who liked this?

@cricklewood
cricklewood commented

I'm glad you're enjoying this bottle, while not necessarily the typical Canadian profile, it's a good representation of what can be achieved in the style.

I think your notes are spot on, it's really about the intensity of the components but it's all kept in balance.

I opened a bottle a few months back and I'm surprised how quickly I've blown through it.

15 days ago 3Who liked this?

@RianC
RianC commented

@cricklewood @Nozinan - Agreed. It's a really well put together whisky. Like all ryes, I have to be in the mood, but when I am this hits the spot.

15 days ago 3Who liked this?

@OdysseusUnbound
OdysseusUnbound commented

@cricklewood It’s unfortunate that this isn’t the typical Canadian profile, imho. I think Canadian whisky would be more interesting if there was more virgin oak, more rye “flavouring” whisky used. But that’s just one man’s opinion. Your review is spot-on @RianC

15 days ago 3Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor commented

@cricklewood please give me your three best examples of 'the typical Canadian profile'.

I can tell you mine in one bottle: Royal Canadian Small Batch. If I were to add two more they would be standard Crown Royal and standard Canadian Club.

15 days ago 0

@Nozinan
Nozinan commented

@Victor With respect, that is not the best Canada has to offer. It's like saying that Old Grand-dad and Kentucky Gentleman are typical of the American Whisky profile.

Most of the Canadian juice goes into glasses with other ingredients. It's probably better to look at the Canadians made for sipping to see what a "typical profile is". Wiser's Legacy, Forty Creek Confederation Oak, Alberta Premium. I leave out Danfield's because you can't get it.

Sure, those bottom shelfers are "typical" Canadian whiskies, but they are not where Canadian Whisky excels.

15 days ago 0

@Victor
Victor commented

@Nozinan, how in the world can you call "typical" the top 2% of Canadian whisky? I can not.

Those high end expressions are each unique unto themselves. They are not a "type".

15 days ago 0

@Nozinan
Nozinan commented

@Victor It's because 98% of the Canadian whisky I drink is in the top 2%.

15 days ago 2Who liked this?

@cricklewood
cricklewood commented

@OdysseusUnbound I agree to a certain degree, I too wish more Canadian whisky would be a bit bolder in it's blending recipes, too many cover the exact same profile or cover the same ground. Thankfully Both Legacy and Dissertation have helped usher a new wave of releases that will hopefully continue on.

As for the use of virgin oak, I think yes and no, I like what it brings to the table but I think it can easily take over. I would like them to use more 1st fill ex-bourbon to finish blends for example, I think that this might bring some of that flavour without being overbearing. I know people knock old refill barrels for Canadian whisky but this type of profile seems to work well once the Corn whisky has reached a certain age, I can think of Canadian Rockies 17 or Danfield's 21 or something like that where that used oak+ long age brings a character that is unique. That said in a younger whisky this might not be so pleasant.

15 days ago 2Who liked this?

@cricklewood
cricklewood commented

@Victor for typical Can whisky profile I think the Standard Canadian Club or Crown Royal are indeed good examples, you could add to that Wiser's Deluxe or Forty Creek Barrel Select, Gibson's 12.

Are they the best? No but they do give you an idea of what flavour territory a Canadian blend has operated in up until now. Crown to me is likely one of the main examples.

Personally I think Legacy operate within that bandwidth as well but the blending stock is selected more carefully (with that Spicy pot-stilled rye) and introduces some new oak into the mix which really helps distinguish it.

I think Canadian whisky has a lot in common with Irish whisky and to some extent rum in the way it has been put together and is sold.

15 days ago 5Who liked this?

@OdysseusUnbound
OdysseusUnbound commented

@cricklewood You touch on a lot of interesting points, and I agree for the most part. It's no secret that I'm a fan of first-fill ex-bourbon barrels for all types of maturation (including well put together blended rums relaxed ). I think one of the area where Canadian whisky runs into problems is that some marketing departments try to push standard Crown Royal or Gibson's 12 as "sippin' whisky", which may appeal to a select few, but at (or near) the same price point you can get Jim Beam Black or Evan Williams Black, both of which are far richer and more flavourful to my palate. The long maturation part of your comment about base whisky and umpteenth-fill barrels is spot on. I'm sure that Gooderham & Worts 19 Year 49 Wellington contained a generous percentage of base whisky in "experienced" barrels but the use of "flavouring" whiskies and red oak inserts was masterfully blended by the Doc to create one of the most complex and interesting whiskies I've tasted this year, from anywhere in the world. I just love the combination of sweet, spicy, and savoury and G&W 19 Year has it all.

14 days ago 2Who liked this?

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