Whisky Connosr
Menu
Shop Join

Amrut Single Malt Whisky

Curried Smoke

0 680

@YakLordReview by @YakLord

11th Sep 2012

0

  • Nose
    20
  • Taste
    20
  • Finish
    20
  • Balance
    20
  • Overall
    80

Show rating data charts

Distribution of ratings for this: brand user

I picked up this bottle in July 2010 while in vacation in Calgary (long before the LCBO had even thought about stocking Amrut), and have been working my way through it over the past 25 months. It has improved over time, the nose picking up a few more traces, the palate developing a delectable spiciness, and the finish lengthening.

I generally do not drink this whisky on its own; rather, I tend to pair it with curries or other East Indian foods (onion bhaji, samossas, pakoras, etc.). Diageo's 'Malt Matcher' suggests Talisker 10 is the ideal match for a curry dish, but I've found that the Amrut works quite nicely, with the whisky's flavours balancing well with either a very spicy dish (such as a tandoori and dansak), where it cuts the spice, or a sweet dish (a kashmiri or korma), where it adds a contrast.

There is spice (garam masala?), some vanilla, and faint hint of peat and smoke on the nose - sort of like a milder version of the Jura Superstition - and the palate reminds me a little bit of Glenlivet 12 year-old or Johnnie Walker Black Label, but there is also something else in it that provides a nice, mildly spicy burn with no bitter aftertaste, and I can't quite put my finger on what it is.

All things considered, the Amrut Single Malt is quite satisfying, and different (and that it should be, as it is distilled and aged in India using malted Indian barley, which is a different strain of barley from that used in Single Malt Scotch whisky). The fact that it is not chill-filtered, and bottled at 46% ABV only adds to the experience.

Related Amrut reviews

6 comments

@BlissInABarrel
BlissInABarrel commented

This is so informative. I like the idea that you're pairing food with whisky. You're a genius! From my understanding Indian barely has the tendency to be sweeter than barely in Scotland; it offers a raspberry-like sweetness to it. I'm curious. Have you had the Amrut Fusion?

9 years ago 0

@CanadianNinja
CanadianNinja commented

Great review! Sounds like a fascinating dram. I would definitely jump at the opportunity to try some. Something that I find very interesting, and I would like your opinion on this. In Canada, I don't believe we have much of a 'combining food with spirits, and for that matter beer' culture. Would you agree?

I feel we are very much a 'time to eat' and a 'time to drink' society. I found this difference to be quite surprising after coming to Japan. The Japanese always combine the eating and drinking experience. Appreciating various beer, sake and shochu is very much a part of the dining experience.

9 years ago 0

@BlissInABarrel
BlissInABarrel commented

what a great question canadianninja. yaklord, shed us some light. i know you're a master baker with booze! ^_^

9 years ago 0

@YakLord
YakLord commented

Those are a couple good questions. First, no, I haven't tried Fusion yet, but it is one of the only Amrut expressions that the LCBO now carries, so I'll definitely have to think about it.

Second,I'd never really thought about drink/food in that way (other than beer and pretzels or beer and bbq food. You may be onto something there, @CanadianNinja.

Growing up, my parents didn't really drink at all - except for wine at holiday dinners. My parents-in-law, on the other hand, are big wine (and micro-brew) people and tend to have wine and/or beer with Saturday night meals...perhaps it was the 15 months I spent in Japan that influenced me, since whenever we went anywhere for dinner, karoake, bowling, etc., there was always food and alcohol.

As for the baking, I just like baking, and the LCBO puts out really nice promotional magazines (for free!) that often contain really good recipes, and have suggestions for pairings. Of the last four cakes I've done, three were from the LCBO magazines. All of the recipes are online - you should check out their database: www.lcbo.com/fooddrink/recipes.shtml

9 years ago 0

@CanadianNinja
CanadianNinja commented

Absolutely brother! Beer and pretzels, beer and chicken wings, wine and pasta... sure! But other than what I would call obvious 'drink and dish' combinations... not a real appreciation for the appropriate beverage and cuisine.

Having lived in Japan, I don't need to tell you that there is a whole other culture out there of combining food and drink in such a way that it isn't even consciously addressed. It is just automatically assumed that the dining experience is one to be shared with the drinking experience.

In Canada (and blssinabarrel feel free to educate us about the culture in the U.S.) it is more or less an 'eat a meal and an hour later go to a bar and binge drink' sort of culture!

9 years ago 0

@YakLord
YakLord commented

Yes, aside from the 'obvious' combinations, there isn't a real appreciation of beverage / cuisine combinations. As I pointed out, the LCBO Food & Drink magazine seems to be taking steps to educate people about pairing wine, etc., with foods (the LCBO even offers Tutored Tasting classes for wine and whisky at some of its larger stores). But I do have to agree, in general, North Americans tend to be beer and BBQ / out at the bar drinkers and to not mix alcohol with food. @BlissInABarrel - what is your take on this?

9 years ago 0

You must be signed-in to comment here

Sign in