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Jim Beam Rye

Not a bad entry Rye

0 577

@MahlzahnReview by @Mahlzahn

29th Dec 2011

0

  • Nose
    19
  • Taste
    20
  • Finish
    20
  • Balance
    18
  • Overall
    77

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Distribution of ratings for this: brand user

Coming form the world of single scotch malts, I've tasted this one as my first american whisky and rye in general. The cheap price and the decent reviews created a somewhat mixed feeling of what to expect, though. So here are my thoughts:

Nose: at first i thought Rye, Rye and...Rye. Very spicy, quite complex (or unsusual based on my experience) but also a little Vanilla and sweetness in the background. The longer I smelled it and after some sips, it got a little more balanced in my nose but still quite new terrain. (19)

Taste: Quite strong and intense Rye. Spices and wood. No more sweetness. But quite nice and tasty ;) (20)

Finish: Average length, quite warming, a little dry, lots of wood and oak, still spicy. In the final 3rd a lil bitter. (20)

Balance and conclusion: In my opinion not a very well balanced Whisky. (18) But a very nice entry point to the world of Rye Whisky at a decent price. Aromas are quite limited and even at 40% it feels quite strong. However, this all could be a lil influenced by my first real Rye experience ;) A nice dram though...will continue to check out higher quality Rye's to get a better feel for it.

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5 comments

@Mahlzahn
Mahlzahn commented

Ok, after some tries and getting used to the overall rye and spicy aromas, there's still a little sweetness/Vanilla on the palate. Couldn't find any mint as in other reviews though...

9 years ago 0

@Victor
Victor commented

Very nice review. Jim Beam Rye has recently varied a lot year to year, as Jim Murray has noted in his Whisky Bibles. The 2008 release was actually MUCH spicier than the currently available Jim Beam Rye, for example. Where I live, in Maryland, which is part of the original US straight rye whiskey distilling region along with Pennsylvania, 40% 'standard' ryes like Jim Beam Yellow Label, Old Overholt (a Pennyslvania brand now also distilled by Beam in Kentucky) and Pikesville Supreme (Heaven Hill distilled, a pre-Prohibition Baltimore brand)cost $ 10-15. They are, depending on the year-batch, often quite good, and would, I think, be amazing if they were bottled at 50% plus and not diluted down to 40% abv. As a rye-ophile I keep hoping that Beam and Heaven Hill will follow Buffalo Trace and some other distilleries and give us some undiluted and less-diluted rye whiskeys to enjoy.

9 years ago 0

@Victor
Victor commented

Additional comment: Heaven Hill does distribute some ryes above 40% abv, such as most of the Rittenhouse ryes at 50% abv. I would love to try barrel proof versions of both the Rittenhouse ryes and of Pikesville Supreme. Barrel proof/cask strength ryes are available from Sazerac corporation's Buffalo Trace distillery (Thomas H. Handy Sazerac Rye), and also Willett single barrel ryes, of undisclosed distillery origin.

9 years ago 0

@Mahlzahn
Mahlzahn commented

Thanks for your comment and feedback! Highly appreciated as this is my first review here on connosr.com :)

In order to get some further Rye experience I have Rittenhouse and WIld Turkey on my shortlist. Any further recommendations which are available here in Europe (Germany)?

9 years ago 0

@Victor
Victor commented

Rittenhouse, Wild Turkey, and Russell's Reserve (another Wild Turkey product) ryes are good solid choices. If you can get Thomas H. Handy Sazeac Rye, Sazerac 18 Rye, Van Winkle 13 yo Family Reserve Rye, or any Willett Single Barrel Rye, try them. I like almost all ryes. My personal favourites are Thomas H. Handy Sazerac Rye, Old Potrero 18th Century Style Whiskey, and Abraham Bowman Single Barrel Rye. Of those, you would probably only have an opportunity to find the Thomas H. Handy in Germany.

Speaking about the opportunity to sample: I look forward to one day having the opportunity to sample a number of the German and Austrian rye whiskies! You know, the American straight rye whiskeys and the rye dominated American bourbon whiskeys came originally from the old world whiskey-making traditions of the German American colonists in Pennsylvania and Maryland.

9 years ago 0

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