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Corby Corby's Lot No. 40 2012 Release

Fragrant Fruity Canadian 100% Rye

0 488

@VictorReview by @Victor

29th May 2013

0

  • Nose
    23
  • Taste
    22
  • Finish
    21
  • Balance
    22
  • Overall
    88

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Distribution of ratings for this: user

  • Brand: Corby
  • ABV: 43%

The 2012 Release is the second release of Corby's Lot No. 40. The whisky is made at the Hiram Walker Distillery, from a single copper pot still. The mashbill is reported to be 100% rye grain, with 90% unmalted and about 10% of it malted, no doubt for the enzymes released. The reviewed sample is courtesy of @Pudge72. The bottle was opened March 13, 2013, sampled two days later, and this sample was re-tasted 10 weeks after that time. I found No Age Statement on the bottle. This review is in sequential format

Nose: this is a very highly perfumed rye, both perfume of fruit and perfume of flowers; there is beautiful rose and a little carnation. The fruits include raisins, plums and black cherries. The rye manifests on the nose as more fruits and not as much as spices. Some wood flavours are noticeable in the nose, seeming to be of re-used, but of good quality, wood, with a little vanilla, and hints of oak and natural caramel. Score 23/25 All whiskies; 24/25 Canadian Category

Taste: very pointed rye flavours, much more pointed and much more spicy than in most Canadian whiskies; the baking spices of nutmeg, cinnamon/cassia, and cloves combine with some serious black pepper here. The fruity flavours are not as strong in the mouth as they were in the nose. The wood flavours are solid. Score 22/25 All whiskies; 22/25 Canadian

Finish: this stays steady, long and strong, adding a bit of bitterness from the wood. Score 21/25 All; 21/25 Canadian

Balance: this is a nice solid rye whisky. The flavours are strong and of good quality, the parts work together, and nothing distracting is thrown in.

How would a blind taster know the difference between a Canadian rye whisky like Lot No. 40 and a typical (i.e. non-wine-influenced) US straight rye? Any wine-cask aging is a give-away. (and yes, I believe that you can taste wine-cask on Alberta Premium) Otherwise it is a matter of tasting the difference between new and used wood flavours. Even this is changing somewhat with Canadian distilleries like Forty Creek using much more new wood than previously. You can taste the re-used wood here, but it is subtle to notice it. Overall, Corby's Lot No. 40 is quite a nice Canadian whisky, in the rye-centric category. As a lover of rye whisk(e)ys I am always happy to see Canada making more of these high quality ryes, untainted by additives and wines. Score 22/25 All; 23/25 Canadian

Total Scores: 88 All Whiskies; 90 Canadian Category

Next step, Corby/Wiser's/Hiram Walker/Pernod-Ricard: would you bottle some of this at 50% ABV and also at 63% ABV and sell it to me?

4 comments

@Pudge72
Pudge72 commented

Excellent review...definitely one of my favourites! I am totally with you on the higher abv option for this one. I think a 50%+ bottle would be outstanding!

8 years ago 0

@Robert99
Robert99 commented

As usual an excellent review. I just reviewed this Lot 40 and we have a lot of similar notes. The big difference is I got a lot of banana, but I know I am very sensitive to banana. That is why, I am not looking for an higher ABV... onless you are using more reused wood to get more plum. Saying that, it is the first Canadian whisky that really got me excited

8 years ago 0

@Victor
Victor commented

@Robert99, I love banana flavour in whiskies, but I only encounter it occasionally. Lucky you that you taste it frequently!

8 years ago 0

@Robert99
Robert99 commented

@Victor I am sure you are blessed to taste flavors I don't even notice. I, for example, have a lot of difficulties to detect coconut. Fortunately, we all have a quest to find the whisky that suit our taste and it is a good thing that we are not all going for the same bottle. Vive la différence!

8 years ago 0

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