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Norlan Whisky Glass

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@Nozinan
Nozinan replied

A gimmick.

3 years ago 0

Astroke replied

@Nozinan An expensive gimmick. Already told family members not to put these in my stocking. Selfish but necessary.

3 years ago 0

@Nelom
Nelom replied

I'm leaning towards gimmick as well, but what gives me pause is the endorsement of the glass by legendary master distiller Jim McEwan in particular, but also whisky writers like Heather Greene and Johanne McInnis. I do call complete BS on the supposed "social" benefits of the glass though.

3 years ago 0

@Victor
Victor replied

I would certainly want to try out the glass before buying one, or having an opinion of it. Could it be a wonderful design? Maybe. Won't know until I get the experience of it. Whiskies do taste and smell much different out of glasses of different designs and dimensions.

3 years ago 0

@Alexsweden
Alexsweden replied

Looks kinda nice anyway. Feels like it's part gimmick and part science. I do like the shape of it over the neat glass though!

3 years ago 0

@Nelom
Nelom replied

@Victor Oh, there's no doubt that glassware has a big impact on both the nose and taste of whisky. When I say I'm leaning towards gimmick, it's only in that I'm not sold on its benefit over a standard Glencairn.

Honestly, if it wasn't for their insistence that a standard Glencairn is somehow antisocial, I'd be more open minded towards this glass. But because of that whole "eye contact" business, it makes me suspect that they're using that as some kind of additional crutch and perhaps the nose and taste benefits aren't really there.

As for the eye contact bit... First: who keeps constant eye contact with their drinking companions? Seems creepy to me. And second: I have no problems drinking out of a Glencairn while continuing to look towards the person I'm with. The video where the guy is suddenly averting his eyes is just laughable. If you're not familiar with what I'm talking about, here's a link: youtu.be/higdn4aXF-M

That's from their Kickstarter campaign.

But then there's quotes like this one: "This is the best glass I’ve ever used... Better than the glass I test my own whiskies with" by the aforementioned Jim McEwen, and suddenly I find myself wondering if perhaps I'm judging them too harshly.

Maybe when/if the price comes down I'll find out.

3 years ago 0

@Spitfire
Spitfire replied

@Nelom I watched the video. Don't really understand how much superior this would be to a standard Glencairn--and I agree, the stuff about the social aspects is ridiculous.

Still, I'd give one a shot if it turned up in my Christmas stocking...

3 years ago 1Who liked this?

@Alexsweden
Alexsweden replied

''an antisocial activity''... You lost me there buddy. What a load of BS.

3 years ago 0

@Mancub
Mancub replied

Thought I'd chime in here since I bought in on the Kickstarter last December when it was going on. I have 2 Norlan glasses and enjoy them quite a bit and so has the few members of my local whisky group that tried them. Do they enhance the experience of taste and smell more than a standard Glencarin? Maybe not, but are they on the same level...I believe so. One of my good whisky friends who was looking forward to trying the Norlan glass noted that the alcohol fumes seemed to be less present with the glass. I've noted this with some whiskies as well. My favorite thing about the Norlan glass though is not the tasting/smell experience, it's the handfeel. It takes your whole hand to hold the Norlan glass rather than just your three fingers that you use to hold a Glencarin. It's like holding a rocks glass but it's smaller and has all the benefits of the Glencarin, which to me sometimes feels like holding a small toy. The other thing to note about the Norlan glass that I really like is the sipping lip. Nothing out there really talks about it, but It's beveled and wider than a standard glass lip. I've described it to a few as similar to a sippy-cup. I know that doesn't really sound appealing, but it actually feels quite nice and is different, creating a different experience. The other people who have tried the glass and remarked on it have also enjoyed that aspect of it's design. So would it be wrong to say that the glass is far superior in smell/taste experience than a standard Glencarin? I think so, personally. But is it safe to say that this is a great glass that brings a much different drinking experience? Definitely! I enjoy having different glasses to drink my whisky from. Also, I've not done a side by side with every whisky, but I bet if I did the Glencarin would win some and the Norlan would win some. I don't believe there is a single glass that IS the best for every pour. If there were, every wine and beer glass would have a standard shape/size and they don't, so why should all whisky be tasted from the same glass? Just the .02 of someone who has first hand experience with the glasses.

Compared to some whisky glasses they are not that expensive either. I bought two of these for my father-in-law that enjoys fine spirits. I really love these glasses but cringe at the cost a little. www.denverandliely.com/whiskyglass/batch8

3 years ago 1Who liked this?

@Nelom
Nelom replied

Thanks for that write-up @Mancub. It's nice to hear from someone who's actually tried it. :) I'm adding your experience to the column that is making me intrigued.

And I definitely echo your thoughts on holding a standard Glencairn. The standard Glencairn being dainty is the primary reason why the Canadian Glencairn is my daily use glass instead of the standard. I just like the feeling of heft I get from a Canadian Glencairn.

How's the weight of the Norlan compared to a standard Glencairn? Or Canadian Glencairn, if you happen to have some of those. I've heard that it is "surprisingly light" but I don't know what that means exactly.

3 years ago 0

@Spitfire
Spitfire replied

@Nelom Hey, what do you mean by a "Canadian Glencairn" as opposed to a standard Glencairn? I'm in Canada, and I have two Glencairn glasses which were gifted to me--they both have "The Glencairn Glass" etched on the bottom, They seem substantial, but not like a kitchen tumbler. (I had another Glencairn previously, but it was very cheap and thin and I broke it easily while washing it.)

Here's one of mine in a pic: photoshare.shaw.ca/image/b/…

3 years ago 0

@Mancub
Mancub replied

@Nelom Happy to share my thoughts. I think it's a pretty unique glass and I don't regret the purchase at all as I've had much enjoyment out of them. Yes, the Norlan glasses are light, maybe more than one would expect. The Glancarin has a heavy base making it feel weighty at the bottom, where as every part of the Norlan feels light. Normally i like something a little heavier, but in this case it doesn't ruin any experience for me. I make sure to very lightly 'clink' my Norlan when I 'cheers' my fellow co-drinker ;). It is a bit more delicate of a glass, but I've had no issues thus far and drink from them pretty regularly. It definitely gives you an appreciation for the craftsmanship that went in to them when you see and hold them.

I like the weight and feel of the Canadian Glencairn too, but it always feels like too big of a glass for the amount of whisky I pour. The Norlan doesn't make you feel that way.

@spitfire Here's a link to a "Canadian Glencarin" on Amazon. If you scroll down to the description there is a little information about it. Cheers! amazon.ca/Glencairn-Crystal-Canadian-Whisk…

3 years ago 0

@Mancub
Mancub replied

@Nelom I just held both the Norlan and Glencarin in either hand, the weight isn't noticeably different, more so it's how they are balanced.

3 years ago 0

@Nozinan
Nozinan replied

@Spitfire @Mancub

The Canadian Glencairn is wider with a flatter base (as in the photo link from @Mancub), and designed with Canadian whisky in mind to accommodate soda or ice. I serve my uncle in a Canadian Glencairn because he insists on ice in his scotch.

I have a few mini glencairns that are smaller than the original. I tasted my first Forty Creek Confederation Oak at the distillery in such a glass. I finally found some online at Laphroaig and I like that distillery's whisky in them. I find the smaller glass helpful for half pours because the nose thins out in a regular glen cairn.

3 years ago 0

@Nelom
Nelom replied

@Mancub Thanks for that comparison. From what I'd read I would've expected the Norlan to be a lot lighter than a standard Glencairn. Glad to hear that that is not the case. While I don't see a Norlan in my immediate future, it may just find its way into my cupboard one of these days when I'm feeling particularly flush with cash.

@Spitfire To add on to what Mancub and Nozinan has already said, the Canadian Glencairn was developed by Glencairn Crystal in Scotland in consultation with the Canadian whisky industry. And yeah, the wider base is a little deceptive in that when you first start using it you may end up giving yourself a larger pour than you intended.

If you're interested in getting one, I can recommend WhiskyGlass.ca instead of Amazon. You save a few dollars compared to Amazon, and I've had nothing but a positive experience when dealing with them. They also have a side-by-side comparison shot of the Canadian Glencairn and the standard:

whiskyglass.ca/index.php/…

If you don't like the Glencairn etching at the bottom of the glass, they have a "True North" version with a couple of different etchings to choose from. I suspect it's something they've special ordered, as I've not seen these versions anywhere else:

whiskyglass.ca/index.php/…

3 years ago 0

Astroke replied

@Spitfire More importantly how was that Benromach cask strength from KWM and how does it compare with Ben 10 100 :)

3 years ago 0

@Spitfire
Spitfire replied

@Nelom Thanks for the link. Looks like I have the standard Glencairn, and gladly...that "Canadian Glencairn" looks oversized and a bit clunky to me--while it might make an OK stemless wineglass, I prefer my whiskies served in small amounts, be they Scotch, Bourbon, or Canadian (and neat without ice, thanks).

@Astroke Oh yes--that's a very nice bottle! I bought 2 of them. 60.4% abv, peated but not overpowering; with a splash of water to bring out the sweetness it becomes one of my absolute favourites. I've never had the chance to sample the Benromach 10 100 I've seen discussed here--much as I'd love to, I've just never even seen it. The best comparison I can make is that it's an amped-up version of the Benromach "Peat Smoke," which despite the label is not heavily peated the way so many Islay whiskies are. (I bought the Ben PS when I found a bottle, based on my experience with my first bottle of KWM single cask; I was not disappointed. Benromach is one of the distilleries whose products I actively search for--but they're hard to find outside of KWM.)

3 years ago 0

@paddockjudge
paddockjudge replied

@Spitfire,

The Canadian Glencairn is an excellent glass. It requires no special technique...no neck twerking or nose avoidance required. It is perfectly balanced, an important trait for whisky. IT WILL NOT TIP! ...two important traits when it comes to whisky. Easy to fill, Easy to empty. Easy to clean. Easy to hold. Easy to overfill. My kind of glass!

3 years ago 0

@Spitfire
Spitfire replied

@paddockjudge Sounds great, I'll continue with my little toy Glencairn though, held delicately with 3 fingers (pinky sticking out, dontcha know!). :-)

3 years ago 2Who liked this?

@Nelom
Nelom replied

@Spitfire I wouldn't say it's clunky. It's basically a cross between a standard Glencairn and a traditional tumbler. But yeah, if you're happy with your Glencairns there's no need to switch it up.

@paddockjudge Who woulda thunk that the guy with a Canadian Glencairn as his avatar would be a big fan of the glass? Weird... ;)

3 years ago 1Who liked this?

@Alexsweden
Alexsweden replied

@Mancub thank you for sharing! Personally I like a light glass, preferably with a stem. Glencairn or a copita.

3 years ago 0

@Ol_Jas
Ol_Jas replied

It has "specially developed protrusion forms" "adapted through studying bio-mimicry"! That's GOTTA be something legit, right?

:)

3 years ago 0

@Nozinan
Nozinan replied

@OlJas Biomimickry is not new to the Scotch industry.

Johnny Walker has been passing "Red" of as whisky for years...

3 years ago 0

@Victor
Victor replied

A pair of Norlan whisky glasses showed up unexpectedly at my door today. These were apparently from the kindness of a friend. I guess I am going to find out in the next few days how these perform with whisky in them. I like the looks of the glasses better in person than in the pictures. They are very light, seemingly more like plastic tumblers than glass. Should be interesting. I will report back when I have used them for nosing and tasting.

3 years ago 1Who liked this?

@Nozinan
Nozinan replied

@Victor Make sure you let us know if in fact they improve eye contact!

3 years ago 0

@Victor
Victor replied

My study is completed. I have sampled the following whiskies in a Glencairn glass and a Norlan glass:

1) Glenmorangie Sonnalta PX, 2) Caol Ila 12 YO, 3) Talisker 57 Degrees North, 4) Ardbeg 10 YO, L10 152, 5) Rebel Reserve Bourbon (a mild wheater), 6) Elijah Craig Barrel Proof Bourbon, Batch # 3, 66.6% ABV, 7) George T. Stagg 2012 Release, 71.4% ABV, 8) Thomas H. Handy Sazerac Rye 2010 Release, 63.45% ABV.

I observe the same effects for each and every one of these whiskies:

1) the noses are fuller, richer, and broader in the Glencairn glass. The Norlan glass diminishes alcohol in the nose, but also diminishes the intensity and range of all flavours in the nose. Whiskeys like the Rebel Reserve and Elijah Craig Barrel Proof almost lose their noses entirely

2) the palatal flavours are also fuller, richer, and broader in the Glencairn glass. The Norlan Glass gives a palate with a narrower band of flavours and reduced complexity. In particular, the bass range flavours are emphasised in the Norlan Glass and the middle and higher range flavours are much diminished or eliminated. Yes, alcohol greeting is also eliminated in the mouth in the Norlan Glass

Overall, I think that the Norlan Glass, like the NEAT glass, will appeal to a segment of the whisky drinking public which is very alcohol averse. The overall nosing and tasting experience is limited to a narrower range in both nose and palate compared to most common whisky glasses, including the Glencairn, Copitas, and Snifters. I do not know what Jim McEwan is smoking in being very enthusiastic about the Norlan Glass. I am very grateful to our friend, JM, for the opportunity to have and to use the Norlan Glasses. They are attractive to look at and easy to handle, but they diminish the experience for one such as I, who is not very alcohol sensitive. Do they allow more eye contact with one's whisky confreres? Maybe, but that seems to me like 'an ingenious solution to a non-existent problem.'

3 years ago 5Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor replied

The Norlan Glass might become my favourite beer tumbler. These Norlan Glasses are extremely easy to handle, are very light and very handy, and the "glass within glass" effect gives a very cool and attractive show to watch while you are drinking. The visual effect of a Norlan full of beer is like a futuristic artwork. I love them for beer.

3 years ago 2Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor replied

Three years after first using them I find the Norlan Glasses diminish the experience of first rate whiskies, but enhance and mollify the experience of nosing and drinking rougher lower quality products. I find the Norlan glass typically deducts 15 points from the experience of a top tier whisky and adds 10 points to the experience of a bottom 10%ile whisky.

Today I am proceeding with my plan to finish my 1.75 Litre bottle of McClelland's Islay Single Malt. It would take a lot more time without the Norlan glasses. Out of a Norlan I can much more readily enjoy it. I would try Norlans on a rough batch of any whisky.

22 days ago 1Who liked this?

@Nozinan
Nozinan replied

@Victor so are you suggesting that with a Norlan, Lambertus could be scored a 10/100?

22 days ago 0

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