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Rum Ruminations

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By @RianC @RianC on 4th May 2020, show post

Replies: page 2/2

@OdysseusUnbound

@Victor I’ve had a sample of the Lemon Hart 151 for a long time. I just haven’t found the time to get around to it....

3 months ago 3Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor replied

@OdysseusUnbound you don't need an hour to do a considered reflection on Lemon Hart 151. 5 ml and you will get the idea--very quickly.

Lemon Hart 151 makes Smith & Cross look mild.

3 months ago 3Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor replied

@OdysseusUnbound of course Smith & Cross is sippable!!! As is Lemon Hart 151, with a caution as to pace. It's been 3 years now since I started spreading the gospel of Smith & Cross among Ontarians. And Lemon Hart 151.

3 months ago 3Who liked this?

@Nozinan
Nozinan replied

@Victor Lemon Hart 151 was an epiphany. I first tasted it in Collingwood with you and @paddockjudge from a 1 or 2 oz sample bottle. Yu allowed me to keep what was left of the sample and I was hooked. Then you brought me a bottle 2 years later I think. I still have some left. I never pour more than 10 cc at a time and it takes a long time to finish. A drop of water opens it in amazing ways.

I've since sourced some from the east coast and I think I distributed some to Sudbury and central Toronto. I almost lost those because my cousin chickened out mailing it. She finally sent it to me by UPS, but to my old address. If I hadn't gotten the tracking number from her I would not have known.

It gave me a chance to visit the old house, and the owner invited me in to show what they had done with it. The painted the kids bedrooms but left the paintings my mother had made on the walls... I was touched.

3 months ago 3Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor replied

@Nozinan thank you for the correction as to the year of our first sharing of Smith & Cross and Lemon Hart 151 Rums. I wasn't sure which year it was and I did not want to overstate.

3 months ago 1Who liked this?

@cricklewood
cricklewood replied

I suppose this is a good place to post this.

I was invited to join a little rum club ran by a Instagram member who's a bartender out of Toronto. Initially I have to admit I was a bit skeptical vis-à-vis the cost and what would be offered. He has an extensive rum collection as well as pretty deep connections so when I saw the first proposed flight I wad convinced of how serious it would be.

In the very first tasting I was able to try a rum that was on my bucket list so that's pretty good already.

The other part I think was worthy mentioning to me was the fact that it was really nice to see diversity in a tasting. These affairs tend to be rather uniform and run by the same bros, so this small but significant impact wasn't lost on me.

The line-up was also diverse in the style of rums, I'll post in depth reviews later.

1-Clairin Communal Ansyen: A blend of the four Clairin producers (Sajous, Vaval, Casimir and Le Rocher) represented by Italian bottler Velier. This style of sucarcane spirit is unique, small producers, homemade pot stills, akin to Mezcal in some ways. It's rarely aged but this one is aged for 18-24 months in ex rum-casks (Bielle, Caroni, Mount Gay, etc.) and ex-whisky and ex-whiskey casks (Benriach, Widow Jane, Buffalo Trace, Jack Daniels, etc.). Amazing, wouldn't have believed a 2 year aged product.

2-Whisky Broker W.I.R.D. (West Indies Rum Distillery) Barbados 2000 (Blackrock): A rare style called Blackrock or Rockley, either made to mimic a closed distillery or as a blending component, last distilled in 1986 & 2000. Very unique, almost meaty or medicinal. Believed to have been distilled on their Vulcan Chamber still.

3-1423 S.B.S. South Pacific Distillery Fiji 2009-2020: Danish Indie bottler that is getting a lot of attention, same goes with SPD out of Fiji, this is from their pot-still and boy is it unique! Not unlike some of the Port Mourant distillates in that you'd think they were making this stuff in the same place as they make, glue, new tires and other materials.

4- Saint-Lucia Distiller's Chairman's Reserve Master's selection Single cask 9 yrs. A rarely seen version from this distillery, this was a blend of rums from 2 of their Pot-stills, blended together and re-racked for an additional 5 years. It had this phenolic quality, weight and presence, not funky in the way folks think of Jamaican rums, really distinct. I am on the hunt now!

The photo shows a set of samples of National rums of Jamaica but that's for another day. I've ranted enough.

3 months ago 9Who liked this?

MRick replied

After rum ruminations and brandy banter, can rotgut rhapsodies be far behind?

3 months ago 2Who liked this?

@OdysseusUnbound

@cricklewood Would that be the sample club proposed by Reuben V? I thought long and hard about that one....

3 months ago 1Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor replied

@MRick there is wonderful mythos/history surrounding that word 'rotgut'.

19th century illegal cadaver trade was sometimes disguised by transporting the bodies in whiskey barrels filled with spirits. The merchants then apparently often sold off the liquor used after the bodies had been delivered for dissection in the medical schools. The unwitting customers received "infused" liquor, you might say. AKA "rotgut liquor"

3 months ago 3Who liked this?

@cricklewood
cricklewood replied

@OdysseusUnbound It is indeed, not cheap but in the scheme of things it's not that bad and it's been strong thus far. This month's line-up is equally as impressive.

3 months ago 1Who liked this?

@OdysseusUnbound

@cricklewood I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask this question, but here goes: Richard Seale says in this video that using a blend of pot distilled and column distilled rum creates a better spirit than if either one was presented "alone". Richard (and you) obviously know way more about rum than I do, but from what I've experienced so far, I disagree. I think that an "exclusively" potstill rum would be more pleasing to my palate, at least where neat sipping is concerned (cocktails are obviously another ballgame). Am I crazy? Richard sounds a bit like a certain well-known Canadian whisky writer who often extols the virtues of less flavouring whisky and more "neutral" whisky in a blend. The elephant in the room is obviously cost and profit margins, right? Column stills are cheaper, more efficient, and thus yield higher profits, right?

13 days ago 2Who liked this?

@Victor
Victor replied

@OdysseusUnbound my instinct would be like yours, to expect more depth of flavours from pot distilled product, than from column stills. That said, there are various different designs of column stills, and a different design will yield a different result, just as a different design of pot still will yield a different result. Generalizations will only take one so far.

13 days ago 1Who liked this?

Astroke replied

@OdysseusUnbound Caroni used both types. Diamond Distillery and Savannah distillery I think also use both, among many others.

12 days ago 1Who liked this?

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@MadSingleMalt@OdysseusUnbound

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