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Bakers 7 Year Old

Average score from 14 reviews and 38 ratings 86

Bakers 7 Year Old

Product details

  • Brand: Baker's
  • Bottler: Unknown
  • ABV: 53.5%
  • Age: 7 year old

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@Pierre_W
Bakers 7 Year Old

Baker's 7-year old is named after its creator Baker Beam, Jim Beam's grandnephew. It comes with a mash bill of 77% corn, 13% rye and 10% malted barley, and is bottled at an ABV of 53.5% (107 proof). Baker's forms part of Jim Beam’s small batch Bourbon collection that also includes Booker's, Basil Hayden’s and Knob Creek. This review looks at batch no. B-90-001.

The nose is sweet and fruity. Flavours of dates and oranges appear first, followed by notes of coconut, caramel and cinnamon. Adding water does not bring forth any more flavours, and in my view this is best enjoyed neat.

The palate is medium-bodied, creamy and lightly spicy. Vanilla now is at the forefront, together with flavours of nuts, caramel and cinnamon.

The finish is of medium length and rather sweet. Notes of coffee and orange peel last until the very end.

This is another superb representative of Jim Beam’s small batch Bourbon collection. As is the case with e.g. Booker’s, the alcohol has been very well integrated, which makes this very drinkable and enjoyable. Compared with Booker's, though, Baker’s is more creamy and silky and an altogether more rounded and less boisterous companion.

@Pierre_W You are lucky to be able to detect coconut. That is not a flavor that I detect easily. This a solid and informative review. Unfortunately, for me , Baker's is a tad too sweet. Well, maybe a little more than a tad... But since I really like it, I use it to sweeten the drams that I find a bit bitter like the Bulleit 95 rye. I have been drinking a vatting of mine in the last few weeks that goes like this. 1 part of CRNHR, 2 parts of Baker's, 4 parts of Maker's 46 and 8 parts of Bulleit 95% rye. It's worth trying.

@Pierre_W, thanks for your very nice review.

I have always liked Baker's Bourbon, and I have always found it to be completely different from all of the other bourbons which Jim Beam produces. I hope that it continues to remain in the Jim Beam small batch collection.

@Robert99

The 7 yo Baker's is part of the Jim Beam family but I read that they use a different yeast to create this one and it shows.

The nose:

This has nothing in common with the other high ABV 7 yo from JB, Booker's. This one has banana (specilay with water), pickle, lilac, mint cherries, clove, cinnamon and vanila. The spices makes me think of the single barrel of a famous Tennessee whiskey. With air, I get more red fruits and became closer to Booker's with more of a nutty profile. Great nose that evolve continuously giving a lot of complexity.

The palate:

More sweetness than expected. A beautifull honeydew melon on the first sip that disappear after then the nuts before the spices and the floral and minty side that are playing a smaller role than on the palate (unfortunately). When swirling this, I get red tea. It is a bit dichotomic, the wood notes are not working all the time with the fruits and floral notes. The clove is predominant and hot. With water, the floral notes are more present and more like rose water.

The finish:

Without water is like a one two punch spices/floral. The two are following each other without unity. With water, the floral notes are their from the beginning and the spices are getting stronger and stronger. It is way better.

The balance:

Good on the nose, a bit off on the palate and the finish but with water good on the palate and very good on the finish.

Conclusion:

Nose and drink half of this one without water, then add water and you will get the best out of it. Somebody with a sweet tooth will enjoy this one. I also have to say the alcohol rush is not as big as with Booker's wich I was expecting with the lower ABV. In the around 50% ABV category, I like when I get a lot of floral notes that is why I would buy 4 Roses SB and Jack Daniel's SB before this expression. Although, I will give a 1 or 2 points bonus for the banana nose.

@Nozinan

Baker’s is another from Suntory - Beam’s stable. I’ve already reviewed a batch of Booker’s, Knob Creek single barrel and Kirkland’s bottling of their bourbon. Now it’s time for Baker’s, seven years old, batch 90-001. This is the second 20 cc tasting of a 50 cc sample obtained from @paddockjudge (thanks). I have never added water to a bourbon and enjoyed the result so this review is of the undiluted product. My children are playing loudly nearby and I think it does actually affect how well I concentrate on this dram.

Nose:

Definitely bourbon. Caramel, vanilla. A hint of a fruit but it is fleeting and I can’t quite pinpoint which one (lime, maybe?). Maybe a hint of chocolate. The alcohol is quite strong, but integrated in the aromas. Some spice.

Taste:

First sip burns, with a strong vanilla presence. Some hints of caramel. This one is very dry. Drier than Bookers. The mouthfeel is also thinner. This is not as rich a whisky. The taste and the nose go very well together. The flavours seem to come out a little more after the first few sips. Again the mysterious fruit in the background.

With milk chocolate it feels even thinner, but a little sweeter. The flavours are a little subdued. With Trader Joe’s dark chocolate covered nibs the whisky becomes sharper, more spicy. I think I like the flavour with the milk chocolate best...but I do like how it changes. And I think the mouthfeel is best neat, without chocolate.

Finish is mainly vanilla.

This is not a bad whisky at all. I didn’t care too much for it the first time I tried it. I think I like it more now. I’m looking forward to my third and final taste some time in the future.

@Paddockjudge, you may dare....

I think this one tastes very different from Booker's. I think it calls for a different setting or mood. I suspect I will like it more as I get to know it better. Somewhere in my travels I was gifted a bottle from the same batch and I look forward to many opportunities to get to know this bourbon...

In my book Baker's Bourbon always tastes a lot different not only from Booker's, but a lot different from everything else that Jim Beam makes. We've had conversations on Connosr over the years about why this would be. I still think that it is the yeast used. The only other good explanation to me would be barrel selection...but that explanation just doesn't quite get there for me.

I have been a fan of Baker's ever since my first sip of it.

@GotOak91

Bakers 107. One of Beam or now Suntory-Beam's Small Batch products. Allegedly to be JB Whites mashbill and yeast just aged longer, in a better part of the warehouse and bottled at a higher proof. Reviewed New Years eve.

Color: Orange-Copper

Nose: Starts with maple syrup and wood polish. Tightly held nose. With time (as always): Notes of vanilla, brown sugar, ripe bananas, roasted nuts and sticky caramel. Sweet and tasty.

Body: Syrupy and heavy. Slow and thick legs meander down the sides of the glass.

Taste: The flavors follow suit with the nose except for soft oak and spice adds balance. It begins to get drier and spicier as it's on it's way out.

Finish: Drying and lingering with pepper and spices (cloves and cinnamon).

Overall: A tasty Beam product. I want to try Bookers next.

Only pressed that once btw.

Only pressed that once btw.

@GotOak91

Bakers 107. One of Beam or now Suntory-Beam's Small Batch products. Allegedly to be JB Whites mashbill and yeast just aged longer, in a better part of the warehouse and bottled at a higher proof. Reviewed New Years eve.

Color: Orange-Copper

Nose: Starts with maple syrup and wood polish. Tightly held nose. With time (as always): Notes of vanilla, brown sugar, ripe bananas, roasted nuts and sticky caramel. Sweet and tasty.

Body: Syrupy and heavy. Slow and thick legs meander down the sides of the glass.

Taste: The flavors follow suit with the nose except for soft oak and spice adds balance. It begins to get drier and spicier as it's on it's way out.

Finish: Drying and lingering with pepper and spices (cloves and cinnamon).

Overall: A tasty Beam product. I want to try Bookers next.

@GotOak91

Bakers 107. One of Beam or now Suntory-Beam's Small Batch products. Allegedly to be JB Whites mashbill and yeast just aged longer, in a better part of the warehouse and bottled at a higher proof. Reviewed New Years eve.

Color: Orange-Copper

Nose: Starts with maple syrup and wood polish. Tightly held nose. With time (as always): Notes of vanilla, brown sugar, ripe bananas, roasted nuts and sticky caramel. Sweet and tasty.

Body: Syrupy and heavy. Slow and thick legs meander down the sides of the glass.

Taste: The flavors follow suit with the nose except for soft oak and spice adds balance. It begins to get drier and spicier as it's on it's way out.

Finish: Drying and lingering with pepper and spices (cloves and cinnamon).

Overall: A tasty Beam product. I want to try Bookers next.

@Matthieu

Well, it's been a while since I last reviewed (or purchased) a whisky. Since I recently had some good fortune, I felt it was a nice way to celebrate by purchasing a new bottle of bourbon.

Notes: First opened the same day as the review. Drunk neat. Bought for 50$CAD at the SAQ.

Nose: Strong caramel with some vanilla, with very faint mint. Some prickling from the alcohol content. It's not the most complex nose I've encountered, but it is warm and very definitely enticing.

Taste: Sweet, dominated by caramel, though nowhere near cloying. Faint fruits, cherries. The alcohol hides itself rather well at this point.

Finish: And here it makes itself known. The finish is spicy and slightly minty, though the dominant aspect is definitely prickling from the alcohol in the throat. After a few moments, it is washed away in a warm wave, leaving a faint aftertaste of cinnamon candy.

Balance: It feels rather simple, but it just hits all the right marks for a bourbon. There are no false notes here, even if it is not the most exciting whisky around. Top mark here.

Will I buy again?: I might, but I probably won't. It's a simple but very well balanced bourbon, a place occupied by the Buffalo Trace, a more affordable option. I hoped it would replace the Maker's 46 (which suffered a recent 10$CAD price hike) as my top bourbon, but I doubt it will.

Nevertheless, a very good whisky and a must try.

Good to see you back, @Matthieu! And it is good to see you drinking Baker's. I've always liked Baker's.

Thanks for your review.

Yeah, glad to be back. I've had a tight budget this year and whisky was definitely a easy cut, but it's great to finally have the opportunity to indulge a bit again.

@Matthieu

Well, it's been a while since I last reviewed (or purchased) a whisky. Since I recently had some good fortune, I felt it was a nice way to celebrate by purchasing a new bottle of bourbon.

Notes: First opened the same day as the review. Drunk neat. Bought for 50$CAD at the SAQ.

Nose: Strong caramel with some vanilla, with very faint mint. Some prickling from the alcohol content. It's not the most complex nose I've encountered, but it is warm and very definitely enticing.

Taste: Sweet, dominated by caramel, though nowhere near cloying. Faint fruits, cherries. The alcohol hides itself rather well at this point.

Finish: And here it makes itself known. The finish is spicy and slightly minty, though the dominant aspect is definitely prickling from the alcohol in the throat. After a few moments, it is washed away in a warm wave, leaving a faint aftertaste of cinnamon candy.

Balance: It feels rather simple, but it just hits all the right marks for a bourbon. There are no false notes here, even if it is not the most exciting whisky around. Top mark here.

Will I buy again?: I might, but I probably won't. It's a simple but very well balanced bourbon, a place occupied by the Buffalo Trace, a more affordable option. I hoped it would replace the Maker's 46 (which suffered a recent 10$CAD price hike) as my top bourbon, but I doubt it will.

Nevertheless, a very good whisky and a must try.

@hunggar

I’ve been told by friends and fellow members (not mutually exclusive) that this would be one for me to try. I often talk about my dislike for cloying sweetness. It’s one of the quickest and easiest ways to turn me off of a whisk(e)y. Quality sweetness, yes. Cloying, no. As such, bourbon is a frequent offender. Not so here. This is a fiercely unique and powerful whiskey. It’s also one of the best Beam offerings I’ve had. Here’s my take on it:

Nose: Not too sweet, which I like. Rye, butterscotch, nutmeg, charred oak, maple, cinnamon, licorice, vanilla and eucalyptus. The vanilla has a distinctive subtlety and airy lightness about it that’s hard to describe. It seems to hover just above the maple and rye foundation. This rye is herbal and grassy but never sharp. It seems to have a more pronounced drying effect than most other Beams. This is a fun one to nose.

Palate: Wow. Did I just say this wasn’t sharp? A semi-bitter arrival with some serious sting. Very unexpected and very lovely. Despite it’s power, this retains a medium mouthfeel. This is dry, big, and prickly. A healthy helping of rye, roasted nuts, oak, cayenne, charcoal, and again that “airy” hovering vanilla note. This has a brilliant intensity.

Finish: This stings for a while (in a good way). Very spicy and very big. Oak, roasted nuts, licorice, hay, vanilla, butter, spearmint, bitter herbs, and a sarsaparilla note that is somewhere between medicine and root beer. There’s a burnt character to this finish. Long and sturdy.

I don’t get how this is a standard Beam mashbill. It really stands apart from its brothers. Where KC is sweet, this is bitter. Where Booker’s pulls us in with its structured complexity, this pulls us in with its untamed vitality. This is a bold, aggressive, unapologetic creature. This bourbon is for the adventurous. It attacks, it stings, it dries, and it punishes you in the best kind of way.

Of course, it follows that some people might see this as unbalanced. I don’t think it is. I think it has the intended effect. It’s big, it’s merciless, it’s unique, and it’s loads of fun. I have to applaud Beam for going out of their way to give us a full spectrum of profiles in their small batch series. This is a solid compliment to the series and my second favorite to date (all hail Bookers!). I’ve tried just about all the Beam small batch releases. Now onto the KC Single Barrel. Sorry KC Maple; you don’t count.

Kentucky Kryptonite. Try it hd2hd with cousin Booker - this an extremely fun exercise, not to mention, potentially dangerous;)

Baker's uses a proprietary strain of yeast that is supposedly exclusive to this expression...full of vanilla, christmas spices, fruit cake and sometimes hints of cacao.

Booker's is cherry-picked from the best barrels and yields more fruity notes, sultanas, cinnamon, - huge wood influence - vanilla - and definite spiciness from the oak.

I find both extremely enjoyable and give the nod to Booker's based solely upon it's medicinal properties. (Dr. Granny's Tonic - Beverly Hill Billies)

Thanks, @paddockjudge. I suspected the yeast might have something to do with it. Booker's is a notch above in my book, too. But Baker's definitely has a rugged charm to it.

I'd love to do a side by side tasting with several small batch releases. Aside from Basil Hayden's and KC Rye, the rest are from the same mashbill. It would be a good way to demonstrate that mashbills are only a small fraction of what gives a bourbon its character.

J

Batch No: B-90-001

Nose: bakery smells of different fresh breads, oily and buttery, hints of fruit peel oils, hints of nuts (almond and hazelnuts), strong vinilla and oak, very sharp and crisp.

Palate: quite dry and prickly on the mouth at first, then becomes more sweet with notes of vinilla and oak, buttery cream, Marzipan, nougat, toasted bread, maybe a hint of bittersweet cocoa.

Finish: spirity heat, bitter-sweetness, buttered corn, almond paste, quite a big dose of oak.

Defiantly tastes older then 7 years. Also even though I know it's high strength it has got a serious alcohol kick to it, while I usually love that kind of heat from a good whiskey I remember the first time I had this I'd bittern my lip the day before and had quite a little blister in my mouth. Needless to say the normally enjoyable spirit heat nearly killed me. Anyway apart from that it's quite a lovely bourbon.

@talexander

My non-alcoholic lunch at County General today made me want to try this new bourbon when I got home (County General has an excellent bourbon selection on full display. If you are in Toronto, check it out, I recommend either the fried chicken or the reuben sandwich). It was worth waiting for. Thin bodies yet with a deep maroon colour. Very complex nose with cinnamon, vanilla and burnt sugar enveloped by charred oak. In the mouth, it is much like the nose, but fiery with cayenne pepper. With water, things get even better - nose becomes buttery, with cocoa and rye - like a baked pie crust! And the taste becomes even more chocolaty, with more and more rye. In fact, the more I taste it, the more it seems to be approaching a straight rye, but with those sweet chocolate pastry elements balancing it out. Very full bodied, with more oomph than its sister Jim Beam's Small Batch, Basil Hayden. Distiller Baker Beam recommends having it over ice with a splash of water, I just may do that later...

Basil Hayden's and Old Grand-Dad (named by Basil Hayden's grandson), have higher rye content mashbills than do the other Beam line Bourbons: White Label, White Label 7 yrs (regional), that 6 yr Black Label that they sell at LCBO (but not in Md.), standard 8 yo Black Label, Booker's, Baker's, and the two versions of Knob Creek. Basil Hayden is often credited with having introduced significant portions of rye into the Kentucky bourbons, having come to Kentucky from Maryland, which, along with Pennsylvania, was the traditional US rye whiskey making region.

I have always found Baker's to taste significantly different from all of the the other Beam products. It is not from the mashbill, and I strongly doubt that it is from the water. Distilleries do use unique yeast strains for their individual products. I have always thought that the distinct taste of Baker's derived from the yeast used. Finding any way to measure something like that is a perplexing question. Differences due to yeast strains seem to me to be something which for the time being have to wind up being lumped into that catch-all container "the ART of whiskey-making".

As to 'younger' taste of Basil Hayden's versus Booker's, I don't find much that I can differentiate in bourbons between 6 and 9 years. 'Young' is frequently associated with weaker, or less intense flavour due to less development. I would be inclined to associate the lesser intensity of Basil Hayden's to the degree of dilution introduced by bottling Basil Hayden's at 40% ABV vs the 53.5% ABV of Baker's. I like the flavours of Basil Hayden's, which is a little unusual for me, since 40% ABV is usually just way too dilute for my taste. Oddly, others have sometimes observed, and I agree with them, that some of the best bourbons are bottled at 107 proof: Baker's, Old Weller Antique 107, and Pappy Van Winkle 15.

Michaelschout: I hope you like it, it's a good place. If you decide to check it out another time besides next weekend, I'd be happy to join and meet you (my weekend is packed).

Victor: I'm extremely impressed with Baker's. Do you think the flavour is really enhanced by the yeast? I'm wondering if the casks have more to do with the flavour (during maturation) than the yeast. But it's perplexing: Basil Hayden's tastes "younger" (at 8 years) than Baker's (at 7 years). Haven't tried Knob Creek nor Booker's yet (but I do enjoy Baker's more than the standard Jim Beam). But the mash bill must be different from the other Beam Small Batches (or Large Batches), I would imagine. The rye notes tell me that has more prominence over any malt or grain....Interesting puzzle........

@Victor

Baker's is a Beam Brands small batch bourbon named after Jim Beam's grandnephew Baker Beam, and is said to be Baker Beam's invention. Beam Brands claims that Baker's uses a special 60 yr old strain of yeast and the standard Beam brand mashbill. Beam small batch bourbons also include Booker's, Basil Hayden's and Knob Creek. Baker's is 7 years old

Nose: fairly strong intensity, a lot of spice, sweet maple, vanilla, caramel, honey

Taste: a pause for 2 or 3 seconds, then an explosion of intense rye spices, mostly pepper, intense oak, sugar maple, oak, vanilla, caramel

Finish: after the explosion of taste, this one hangs around only for a short time before falling to the ground like Ikaros or fireworks. Jim Murray gave Baker's a mediocre grade of 81.5/100 primarily because he disliked the 'finish'

Balance: I see this bourbon as one of the "big statement" whiskeys, like Old Grand-Dad 114, which does not attempt 'balance' or coherent finish. If you can enjoy the extremely amazing palate flavours and don't insist upon a refined concept of 'finish' then you can really love this bourbon. Two years ago, when I had tasted only 6 or 8 bourbons, this was my favourite bourbon. I am a "big flavours" guy: Ardbeg Uigeadail, Aberlour A'bunadh, George T. Stagg, Thomas H. Handy Sazerac Rye, William Larue Weller, Willett and Old Potrero are my favourite whiskies. If you are a 'big flavours' drinker, give Baker's a try. Also, I do in fact very much suspect that the yeast strain used in Baker's has everything to do with its unique taste-- it really doesn't taste to my palate anything like any of the other Beam products. I thought this about the yeast being the unique Baker's flavour factor long before I read that Beam stated this to be the case. I strongly believe that the differences in yeast strains accounts for many of the differences in the flavours of various whiskies. No one likes to talk much about the yeast influences in whiskies-- I suspect because this factor is so difficult to pin down, define and quantify

Just came from a Whiskey Fest. Ended up buying 2 bottles of Bakers. I loved the big sweet bite! Other bourbon and ryes on hand that I tasted were: Bulliet 10 YR.Old, George Dickel Barrel Select, Rock Hill Farms, Bookers, Blantons, Calumet, Buffalo Trace, Wathens, Medley 12 YR.Old, Bulliet rye, Dickel Rye. I tried Buffalo Trace first and than Blantons. Third taste was Bakers and this one I really loved. At I price of $29.99 this was by far the best value and Eagle Rare which was $24.99. Calumet was priced the highest at $50. In conclusion after trying the bakers I could find no other bourbon that I enjoyed more than the Bakers. To give you an idea of my bourbon experience I believe Wild Turkey is the ultimate bourbon to begin with at about $21 a bottle and Four roses Yellow Label would be the first bourbon to have someone try for a smooth experience.

@Victor, it can be tough to find, but there are some pretty reputable sources, like Chuck Cowdery, that have pointed this out. Bourbon boards can be quite helpful, too. The promotional packaging for Baker's makes a lot of the jug yeast, but from what I recall, they never outright say that they use it exclusively for Baker's.

To the best of anyone's knowledge, Beam has only two bourbon mash bills (using a different yeast for each): one for Jim Beam (white, black, etc.), Knob Creek, Booker's, Baker's, Old Crow, and Old Taylor; the other for Old Grand-Dad and Basil Hayden's.

@dbk

Baker’s is one of four expressions in the Beam—as in Jim Beam—Company’s “Small Batch” line of bourbons, the others being Basil Hayden’s, Booker’s, and Knob Creek. The mash bill is the Jim Beam recipe, and it is used for Booker’s and Knob Creek as well. Although there is considerable parroting of the phrase “Baker's Bourbon utilizes a special strain of jug yeast that has been in [the Beam] family for over 60 years”, I suspect the yeast strain is also shared among Baker’s, Booker’s, and Knob Creek, if not the entire Beam enterprise.

Baker’s is a classic ryed bourbon on the nose, leading off with crisp, dry rye, but moving quickly to incorporate vanilla, walnuts, butterscotch, and maple syrup.

The palate is dry and oaky, with rye, caramel, vanilla, and hints of cherry. Again, there is a distinct nuttiness, especially of walnuts and perhaps roasted peanuts. It is quite hot, a little too much so.

The body is fairly rich and creamy, though a little less than you might expect, given the oak overtones.

Overall, Baker’s is a good bourbon. It’s more interesting than many bourbons of similar price, and though it is admittedly unbalanced—the heat in particular is a bit of a nuisance (and I’m not one to shy away from a heat in my bourbon)—it is a fine dram.

@WhiskyNotes

Nose: new leather, mint. Rye. Caramel, vanilla and some cinnamon. Flowery notes as well, which is not really common in bourbon but quite nice indeed. Less powerful than other cask strength bourbons maybe but smoother and a tad more complex. With a splash of water: hints of banana and ripe plums. Mouth: rich and mellow. Peppermint, vanilla. Some caramel and toasted peanuts. Spicy, although the alcohol may help to exaggerate this. Pine wood. Finish: banana with a dark chocolate coating. Ginger. Sweet and medium long.

Such a stellar review, for such a low rating. After reading your review i expected at least an 86

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