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anCnoc 12 Year Old

Average score from 20 reviews and 78 ratings 84

anCnoc 12 Year Old

Product details

  • Brand: anCnoc
  • Bottler: Distillery Bottling
  • ABV: 40.0%
  • Age: 12 year old

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@Georgy
anCnoc 12 Year Old

Boy, is it good to be back! After a slight break from whisky, and after having explored the world of good quality beers and wines for a little while, I was tempted to pick up a bottle of this often overlooked whisky. And so I did! With whisky prices growing like crazy and the Russian ruble diminishing in value, it can be challenging to keep up this alcoholic journey in Moscow. However, the price tag on this bottle was so nice I thought I'd give it a shot. So what do I think?

NOSE: one of the most complex noses I've ever got out of a light speyside whisky. A lot of malt, hay, sweet and fruity. There's a Russian version of rock candy which is just basically melted sugar with different coloring mixed in which is then dried into the shape of a rooster. And it's definitely here. Vanilla, some green grassy notes, acacia honey, a hint of green pepper with lemon flesh and peel. Canned pears in sugar syrup. Hint of banana custard, orange zest, some nuttiness and a remote touch of menthol toothpaste (but in a good way). Cinnamon, cinnamon verum, in particular, because this variety has a more candy-type smell to it. And finally cilantro and a touch of peat (almost indistinguishable). Wow! 24/25

TASTE: this is where this whisky fails a little bit, in my opinion. It comes on like this well-meaning, fruity chap on the nose which really makes you expect something similar on the palate. But then you take a sip and boom: lots of peppery flavor, very big Talisker /Clynelish type pepperiness with fruit which is almost totally covered in this attack of pepperiness. I say pepperiness, because it's not like black pepper or chili pepper. It's just neutrally peppery. Then you get some honey, citrus, pineapples, apples disappearing into the finish. 20/25

FINISH: malty, a hint of sour kiwi and some fresh white fruits. Long, but very delicate. So delicate, in fact, that it's easy not to notice it at all. But it's there. 19/25

BALANCE: 18/25

OVERALL IMPRESSION: a very complex and interesting whisky indeed. However, it's very unbalanced. The transition from the aroma to the palate is, to put it mildly, intense. So intense, in fact, that is doesn't really help the flavors of this whisky to come out. It masks them a little bit. So is a good whisky? Definitely worth a try. Would I buy it again? I might think twice. I do enjoy the nose. The taste...not as much. But it's not horrible.

@Pierre_W

anCnoc single malt is produced at the Knockdhu ("black hill" in Gaelic) distillery in Huntly in Aberdeenshire. The distillery was founded in 1893 by DCL (Distillers Company Limited), and production started in 1894. Shortly after the distillery had been taken over by SMD (Scottish Malt Distillers) in 1930, it was closed but production resumed in 1933. During the Second World War Knockdhu was closed again and served to house troops from India. While whisky production resumed after the war, the distillery was closed one more time when United Distillers (the owners at the time) decided to stop production after the economic crisis of the early 1980s had hit Scotland. In 1988 Inver House bought Knockdhu distillery from United Distillers and restarted production at the beginning of 1989. The distillery changed ownership again in 2001 when Inver House were acquired by Pacific Spirits, a subsidiary of Thailand-based Great Oriole Group – who in 2006 sold Pacific Spirits including Knockdhu distillery to International Beverage Holdings, the international arm of ThaiBev, Thailand's largest beverage company (they are the current owners). Over the years the proprietors of the distillery switched a number of times between 'An Cnoc' ("the hill" in Gaelic) and 'Knockdhu'. The last change happened in 2003 when that name changed back to 'An Cnoc' from 'Knockdhu'. The current 12-year old version was introduced in 2003 and belongs to the distillery's core range.

The nose starts with a soft maltiness that is immediately followed by a load of lemon flavours. Later on there is vanilla, dough, breakfast cereal, and honey. What a lovely nose – very clean and fresh!

The palate is light-bodied and just a tad spicy. Flavours of lemon and vanilla are at the forefront, together with a light beer-like maltiness, followed by a hint of coffee. Overall very well balanced and a joy to sample.

The finish is of medium length and pleasantly warming. Soft wood spice mingles with notes of honey and cereal.

This was my first anCnoc bottle ever, bought at the insistence of a fellow malt maniac, and I must say that my modest expectations were massively exceeded. This might be an entry level single malt but one that is clean, fresh, and very well balanced. Probably a bit underrated and just perfect for the current hot summer weather. I now look forward to tasting the 16-year and 18-year old expressions.

Thanks, Pierre_W. I found your background information on the distillery and the names to be very clear and very helpful. I am looking forward to trying this one.

I have been sitting on an unopened bottle of An Cnoc 12 for a couple of years now. My expectations have always been pretty high for this bottle, though, because almost all of my friends who know it love it, and so does Mr. Murray. I think the lower expectations are mostly from those who don't think that barley on its own can carry a whisky. Malty malts (unpeated and without wine influence) seldom get rave overall ratings from large bodies of malt whisky fans.

Hi @Victor, thank you for your comments. You are quite right, malty malts do have their very own charm and it would be a mistake to ignore them. Another good example is Glencadam 10yo to which I was (indirectly) introduced by @hunggar. My case is even less excusable as An Cnoc simply had not been on my single malt radar, although I could not tell now for what reason. This was an eye-opener, and it might become one of my favourite Scottish single malts.

@Uisgebetha

A very pleasant light floral speyside malt. Quality whisky of this type and scores highly, but not something to get too excited about.

Nose: White wine, golden syrup, honey and vanilla Taste: Quite full bodied despite the lightness, like single cream. Sweetness dominates with floral hints and citrus. Finish: More bitterness towards the finish and dryer, citrus lingers with a touch of sweet white wine at that, sauternes perhaps.

@hunggar

An Cnoc has its fair share of lovers and haters. I’m neither, but I can say that the 12 yr old in particular is very, very interesting. When I say that a malt is interesting, that’s usually a compliment. But I’m not entirely sure if that’s the case here. Rarely does reviewing a whisky have me so confused. I really don’t know what to make of this stuff. At all. Here are my notes:

Nose: Medium honey, barley, vanilla, grass, apples, apple cider, pastry crust, gummie peach candy, and some distant smoke. Occasionally I’ll even get a whiff of curry or mustard thrown in. Bright, pleasant, and interesting.

Palate: Very watery mouthfeel. I get some banana cream, honey, pecan, grass, Frosted Flakes, milk, and apple vinegar. These build up to a crescendo of Indian spices. Think cumin, curry, and mustard.

Finish: Curdled milk, hay, smoke, wasabi root, mustard, woodspice, oak, cornmeal, Frosted Flakes, buttered crumpets, and sponge cake.

This was a tough review. I’m almost through my bottle and I’m still not sure I “get it.” At the right time this can be a brilliant whisky which delights you with obscure flavours and fiery crescendos. At the wrong time it can be a thin, diluted, unstable disappointment. Without water the flavours are less crisp or forward. However, when added, water does no favours to the already thin mouthfeel. Yup… this whisky is a weirdo. From the strange flavours to the abrupt transition between watery and spicy, this one always leaves me a bit puzzled. It’s a challenging, elusive, unstable, enigmatic weirdo that has me scratching my head. Oddly enough, that is precisely why it’s loads of fun to drink. It gets points for keeping it interesting. HOWEVER… I’m still genuinely not sure if I even like this stuff.

@FMichael: That’s actually very possible. If my bottle as a whole was a dud, then it could be said that I never got to know this whisky at all. But if it wasn't a dud, then perhaps is just a case of different tastes at work.

Either way, I found this one both fascinating an elusive. And I can totally appreciate why some people would love it. A lot of people praise this for its consistency. My issue isn’t that the whisky is inconsistent, but rather the character itself is confused. For me “grassy” is a broad term, encompassing anything from Japanese to farmy to herbal. I get grass here, as do many others, which I don’t find incongruous. What I do find distinctive about this is the Indian flavours of fennel, cumin, curry, and mustard. They are rarely mentioned in other reviews, which leads me to suspect that this may indeed be different. Perhaps I do need to give this a second go with a fresh bottle. If I do that and my perspective changes, I’ll be sure to post an update on this review.

Thanks, I do appreciate the input and you may be completely right about that.

Well, you've got me baffled here. I own a bottle of An Cnoc 12 which I haven't opened yet. From previous reviews, I always expected it to be bright, light, grassy and refreshing. When I give it a try I will now also be looking for wasabi and mustard. Curious, and curious how An Cnoc 12 one has lovers, haters, and indifferenters.

@ElCocos

Nose: Champagne, apple cider, demerara sugar, mild smell of earthy smoke and sooty brickstone, butterscotch and sweet lemon rounds it off.. Pleasant nose

Palate: Smoky and and some pointy slightly vinegary fruit notes is the main theme, altogether though its abit watery and medium to weak output of flavours.. Reminds me of a watered down glenlivet nadurra with more smoke..

Finish: Mild smoky finish with hint of anise, tiny citrus hints and faint butterscotch.. Medium length

Gentle and balanced, its just not exiting enough for me, I need more liveliness and/or unique complexity. Decent, but there are other cheap 40%ers id rather drink as a “daily dram” For example Laphroaig 10, Famous Grouse 12yo Gold Reserve, Tullamore Dew 12yo Special Reserve, they are not similar in style though, too anCnoc 12 or each other ;).. Also become fond of cheap grappas lately, they pack good amount of flavors and complexity, espresso and grappa is a recommended combo for big flavour guys!!.. :)

R

For the whisky connosr on a tight budget, the An Cnoc 12 might be just what the doctor ordered.

I'm not on a tight budget, per se, but I'm very far from being "well healed" either. But I'm a whisky nut. It's my hobby right now, and I embrace the magic of the dram. Over the past five years, I've tasted some really top notch drams like a 30-something Brora and a few glasses of Balvenie Tun 1401 Batch 3.

Yes, over the past few years I've become a bit of a whisky snob, so please forgive me if my review of the An Cnoc 12 is a little less than upbeat.

For another 20 dollars (American) a whisky drinker could buy a bottle of Springbank 10 year, which happens to be one of my favorites right now (2012 bottlings of it, anyhow).

I wasn't blown away by the An Cnoc 12. It's complex, yes, but not necessarily pleasing. In other words, it doesn't "ring my bell," so to speak, whatever the hell that means. . . .

Here are my tasting notes on this complex dram that Ralfystuff liked so much, he gave it an 89 (really, Ralfy?). Then again, Serge at Whisky Fun was not so kind (84).

AN CNOC 12 BASIC TASTING NOTES

Appearance: nice "straw" pale hue tells me this whisky has no artificial color. That's a plus right off.

Nose: Some sharp alcohol bitterness, even at 40%. This said, I will not add water. The palate won't support any more water, IMO. Floral nose with nectarine, green apples, prunes, Queen Anne's lace, living grass, compote. Just a hint of honey, along with model airplane glue (a minus in my book) and some slightly curdled malt.

Mouth: Sweet to bitter: Grass sap, unsweetened caramel, grape nuts (Post co. cereal), anise, hot buttered white wheat toast, pie crust, tart apples.

Finish: Medium length, bitter fruit, grass sap, English muffin (toasted), some bitter alcohol but not much burn. A little in the middle of the tongue.

Without seeing Serge's score last night when I filmed a video review of this whisky, I scored it first an 82, then raised my score to an 84, which happens to be the same as Serge's.

THIS IS MY 99TH REVIEW FOR WHISKY CONNOSR!

Here is my Youtube vid on An Cnoc 12: www.youtube.com/watch

Hey rigmorole, great video! Just watched it and had a good time doing so. Sincere, honest, and it made me want to taste the An Cnoc 12yo (I have never had an An Cnoc so far), so what better praise can there be? Well done!

Thanks for a great review. I've been looking for a trustworthy opinion on this one for a while. Let me know if you ever get the chance to sample the 16. I've heard that's pretty decent.

Loved the video review. I really like it. Crisp and to the point. Makes me want to believe you, if you know what I mean. Seems honest.

Keep up the great work!

@talexander

I reviewed this malt about four months ago - here is a re-post of my original review - I would not change my current assessment of this one iota:

"My friend Rick Culver came by earlier today, and popped open a 1997 Aultmore, 12 years old, bottled by G&M for their Connoisseurs Choice label (refill sherry casks, 43% ABV) Very nice, and I commented that it was an elegant choice for this hot summer day today. After he left, I thought hmmmm...what other malt be right for this lovely afternoon?

Look in vain for the anCnoc Distillery - it doesn't exist, and never has. This is one of the few single malts that has a totally different name than its distillery (in this case, Knockdhu, who did not want any confusion between it and Knockando, another Speysider). It has only two stills, wooden washbacks, stone-built dunnage warehouses and still uses worm tub condensers - little has changed since it opened in October 1894. In fact, it was the first distillery built by DCL (later known as Diageo), who then closed it in 1983. Six years later it was re-opened by Inver House, who didn't change a thing. Thank God.

The colour is a bright pale gold. The nose is bright as well, fresh and fruity, with honey, lemon citrus and baskets of barley sugar. Some cocoa as well, and a little briny. Sweet and refreshing, perfect on a hot summers day like today. Water seems to add an almost peaty element to it!

On the palate, more honey with a creamy mouthfeel - this has some body to it. The vanilla and citrus is very much in keeping with the nose, absolutely delicious. A little brighter with water, believe it or not - and spicier.

The finish is long and lingering, and a little spicier than you would think. This has a wonderful balance between having some serious body to it (perhaps thanks to the old-fashioned worm tubs) while retaining that light and fruity Speyside character. Beautifully done - this would make a much better single malt introduction for the novice, than the usual Glens. If you are interested, Jim Murray scores this a 94.5."

Based on your review, I just got some today and had my first dram tonight. I agree that it's a terrific introduction to single malt Scotch for the novice single malt drinker. At first, I thought you might have over-praised it. I'm a believer now, and I consider myself at least modestly experienced. In the end, we all know what we prefer.

talexander - nice review!

Agreed with pretty much everything you've noted; it's been one of my favorite, and 'go to' single malts this past year.

It's so good that it'd garner serious consideration if you were hypothetically stuck on an island with only 1 whisky to drink.

@MisterDigger

This is a wonderful Highland Single Malt that is ruined by one of the dryest finishes that I have ever come across. As one famous Cajun chef once said something like "Good food will make you want to take another bite". Well, a good single malt will make you want to take another drink. In the case of An Cnoc 12, all I want after a dram of this is lots of ice water (which is probably a good thing).

As for the nose and taste of it that makes it so wonderful, imagine a slightly less fruity Clynelish 14 with just a hint of smoke. I also notice a bit of Lowland grassy taste. For those of you who hate heavily sherried malts or peat monsters, this may be just right for you. The dry finish will also make sure that it lasts a long time.

These reviews led me to try a bottle, since no bar in my area has any for sampling. I don't regret buying it, especially at only $31 US, but I won't be buying another bottle.

I've had my bottle open for 2 months now maybe time to go back and have a taste. I don't remember a dry finish but to be honest I don't remember anything about it but the fact that it had a Very light taste to. Someone here once said that it gets beat up by a Glenfiddich 12 yr I find that to be a fair statement.

If Glenfiddich 12 beats this one up, then that is not saying much for An Cnoc. If you have had this bottle for two months, then it is a lot drier than you think. Sad how a finish can ruin an otherwise good single malt.

@talexander

My friend Rick Culver came by earlier today, and popped open a 1997 Aultmore, 12 years old, bottled by G&M for their Connoisseurs Choice label (refill sherry casks, 43% ABV) Very nice, and I commented that it was an elegant choice for this hot summer day today. After he left, I thought hmmmm...what other malt be right for this lovely afternoon?

Look in vain for the anCnoc Distillery - it doesn't exist, and never has. This is one of the few single malts that has a totally different name than its distillery (in this case, Knockdhu, who did not want any confusion between it and Knockando, another Speysider). It has only two stills, wooden washbacks, stone-built dunnage warehouses and still uses worm tub condensers - little has changed since it opened in October 1894. In fact, it was the first distillery built by DCL (later known as Diageo), who then closed it in 1983. Six years later it was re-opened by Inver House, who didn't change a thing. Thank God.

The colour is a bright pale gold. The nose is bright as well, fresh and fruity, with honey, lemon citrus and baskets of barley sugar. Some cocoa as well, and a little briny. Sweet and refreshing, perfect on a hot summers day like today. Water seems to add an almost peaty element to it!

On the palate, more honey with a creamy mouthfeel - this has some body to it. The vanilla and citrus is very much in keeping with the nose, absolutely delicious. A little brighter with water, believe it or not - and spicier.

The finish is long and lingering, and a little spicier than you would think. This has a wonderful balance between having some serious body to it (perhaps thanks to the old-fashioned worm tubs) while retaining that light and fruity Speyside character. Beautifully done - this would make a much better single malt introduction for the novice, than the usual Glens. If you are interested, Jim Murray scores this a 94.5.

@FMichael - I don't recall how much it costs here in Ontario, but even here it was reasonably priced.

@Victor - "barley sugar" is a tasting note I get from a lot of lighter, non-peated single malts - it's like a sweet cereal note. I've detected it when I've tasted wort at single malt distilleries; I'm no whisky-maker but it makes sense to me that the sugars in the wort would carry that sweetness over into the spirit. I've tasted sweetness from many new make spirits from single malt distilleries, and I definitely got some sweetness from Buffalo Trace White Dog. Corn has a lot of sugar in it, so no that flavour doesn't all come from the cask. The "sweet" elements coming from a cask would taste very different from "sweet" elements coming out of the spirit.

Well, that's Rick, eh? We then tried the spirit we have maturing in our little casks; then walked over to the brunch place around the corner. I had Pulled Pork Eggs Benny! Didn't need to eat for the rest of the day...

@WhiskyBee

AnCnoc 12 is the taped-glasses, pocket-protector nerd from your school days. On one hand, it’s too weak to combat even the tamest of adversaries. It got into a fight with my Glenfiddich 12 the other day, but the anCnoc just wasn’t strong enough to defend itself. When approached with care and understanding, however, the aC12 reveals its intellect and five-dollar-word vocabulary.

If you’re not in the mood for serious study and tasting notes, it’s a fine easy sipper for a summer’s day. Or, if you’re in the mood for serious study and tasting notes, it offers a rewarding treasure hunt. But a casual, in-between approach—say, a sniff and a sip every few minutes (the way I usually drink when I’m not writing one of my lousy reviews)—won’t elicit much more than a meh. Because it’s feather-light but packed with hidden flavors, you have to approach this one with either complete disinterest or the intensity of Sheldon Cooper searching for the Higgs-Boson.

Tasting notes based on my fifth or sixth dram from a bottle opened in December:

Nose: Apples, but with a boozy bite, as in Jersey Lightening or applejack. Also plenty of flowers, honey, vanilla, malt, a healthy dash of pepper, and some sourdough bread. Too bad the moderation on the palate doesn’t live up to the intensity promised by the nose.

Palate: Not much at first but hard, mineral-y tap water with a few sprinkles of sugar. Very disappointing arrival, but it gets more interesting as it develops. Reminds me a bit of Hawaiian pizza with cheese, tomato sauce, and pineapple. Some typical Scotch flavors as well: malt, vanilla, caramel, and plenty of oak. There’s also sour citrus, apples, sweet cream, and pepper. An odd combination overall, yet everything is so light and subtle that nothing overwhelms to throw off the balance. I like the taste, but it’s so subdued that it took two drams and several long sips before I could pick out all the flavors.

Strengths and weaknesses in the finish combine for a mediocre final act. It’s not particularly long, it’s much too grassy and oaky, and a final note of chalkiness is an abrupt neutralizer. On the upside, most of the aforementioned sweet notes return for a quick curtain call and well-earned applause.

I’ve never had a truly bad encounter with anCnoc 12, and there have been a couple of times when it’s come close to a wow experience. Previous tastings ranged from 79 (a C-plus) to 89 (a B-plus), so we’ll split the difference and give it a solid grade of B at 85. You may find it underwhelming, or you may be rewarded if you put some work into it.

The anCnoc 12 yr is one of those single malts that doesn't possess anything outstanding, nor horrific, but it's a solid well rounded every day dram...Personally I like it quite a bit, and it's one I've been enjoying more often than others these past few months.

@Rantavahti

I had heard good things about An Cnoc 12 from couple of my whisky buddies here in Finland. For me it didn't light any sparkles, it wasn't bad either but in my opinion, it felt a bit too flat-lined throughout the tasting. It was easy to drink and it balanced nicely between sweet and spicy notes.

An Cnoc 12 year old should easily fit into a nice summer evening with friends. It's a light romantic comedy such as (500) Days of Summer, without the complexity though. The 500 days aren't there in An Cnoc's favor. They're there because An Cnoc 12 was too common (not that the movie was...).

Nose: Nice aromas, freshly floral with citrus. Sweet hints of honey influence on the background. Definitely the past part of An Cnoc 12.

Taste: Sweet and every taste is subtle. Spices and herbs with some chocolate. For me it was very hard to spot different flavors.

Finish: Length is nice but the finish felt a bit dull. Oak and barley mostly stand out.

Balance: Everything was in a nice balance in this medium bodied dram. For my taste it was maybe too flat with nothing pointing out so well. All in all, a decent whisky.

My 1st anCnoc was the 16 yr expression, and truth be told I was unimpressed; it's not that I didn't like it - just that it was nothing special for a 16 yr single malt.

I was a bit hesitant on trying the 12 yr anCnoc, but gave it a shot, and I'm I did for I personally found it alot more flavourful, and having more character than it's older brother.

@ ClanVidela - give the 12 yr expression a try; IMHO it's one of the best 12 yr single malts out there, but then again I'm a big fan of vanilla/malty/citrus/slightly spicey single malt whiskies.

@CanadianNinja Though I'm not a fan of either one of these, I have to point out that the film was used mainly because of the title that sums up this An Cnoc for me. Meaning that it tastes so common that it might as well be enjoyed 500 days of summer...

@setfree

very smooth and fruity... not peaty but a complex malt... long finish but not at all bitter... not bad for everyday drinking with friends or even during special occasions... surprisingly cheap for a quality bottle...

@Devo

Nose: Right off the top I get a strong presence of tart apple--granny smith apple, or apple jolly rancher. Then, green grapes and honeyed lemon/lime.

Taste: On the tongue the first arrivals is that of creamy honeyed barley for just a quick moment, then the zesty fruits start coming out --with the exception of the apple, surprisingly. The malty tastes come back as you swallow, more subtly than the arrival and with a bit of pepper now. Very smooth.

Water rounds out the zesty flavours, much better kept neat.

Finish: For a light whisky this has a longer and more complex finish than you'd expect. The malty notes return as the fruitiness fades, evolving with pepper to vanilla oak then stewed camomile tea with honey.

Summary: This whisky is currently my first choice if I'm looking for a change of pace from the smoky, peaty varieties that I generally tend to gravitate more towards. An excellent value for the price too!

Nice review...This is why I don't do them; my ability to pick out certain scents/flavours is somewhat limited...The granny smith apple that you got on the nose is exactly what I'm talking about; I could smell "something", but wasn't able to put a finger on it...Now that you pointed it out - I do in fact find the "tartness" in this whisky...Overall I'm impressed - it's a really nice dram!

@IainVH

Sampled without water in a Glencairn glass. Good strong but slim legs (think Steffi Graf).

Colour : Straw

Nose: An initial peppery smell with a faint orangeness in the background. Quite rich and pungent.

Taste: A curious mixture of sweet and spicy. Imagine vanilla ice cream with a pinch of black pepper mixed into it with a thin coating of orange sauce resting on the top. Quite complex with one or two tastes which my inexperienced palate cannot identify sadly. Very pleasant indeed.

Finish: Not overly long but well rounded and makes your tongue throb slightly but not in an unpleasant,too much alcohol type of way. The pepper and orange mixture lingers on to the very end.

When I first tasted this dram a while ago I wasn’t overly impressed. But having re-visited it several times it has definitely grown on me. I originally scored it at 75 but have since increased that considerably. When the bottle is finished, which won’t be too far in the future, I will no doubt replace it immediately and it should become a definite fixture in my cabinet.

Whilst I agree that what’s inside the bottle is the important thing, I must say that I find the bottles labelling and packaging very none descript and drab. Whilst many will appreciate the white with black lettering simplicity, I feel it makes the whisky resemble a supermarkets own brand and it looks more like a Sainsbury’s single malt or Tesco finest scotch whisky type of affair, which it definitely is not. Superfluous maybe but who cares? I used to be indecisive but now I’m not so sure. :) Cheers.

Agreed, on all points. This really left me cold the first time i tried it, but it does slowly and surely get under your skin. Still think it's Old Pulteney's "little brother", which is a compliment...

Cheers for your comments Smokey!

@Rosal

This is one of the first Whisky's I tasted.

Nose: Nice fresh floral smell. Light light sweetness. Maybe a hint of lemon.

Taste: A touch of smoke. Then leads to honey dew and pear sweetness.

Finish: Dry and short finish

@dbk

anCnoc, the rebranded Knockdhu, is the fruit of the Knockdhu distillery in Speyside. Under the patronage of Inver House, the distillery’s current owner, anCnoc has released two aged expressions—at 12 and 16 years of age—and several vintage expressions as well.

On the nose, anCnoc 12 year-old is creamy, rich, and bright with vanilla, butterscotch, and honey. It is a veritable fruit salad of lemon, orange, fig, and apple, yet with a subtle yeastiness, the combination of which is reminiscent of panettone.

The palate is light and sweet. It is biscuity and zesty, with more fruit notes, especially of cantaloupe, lemon, pear. In all, anCnoc 12 year-old is absolutely charming.

@galg

olour: Pale gold

Nose: Crisp,light with vanilla, honey and some citrus notes (lemon rind). some grass. Light and crisp, that would best describe it.

Palate: Fruity, mostly sultanas, sweeter than the nose suggests with the lemon less evident. cereals, and pear Schnapps too.

Finish : fruity, some metal notes (brass), quite short.

Bottom line:

a nice Speysider, light, simple, and refreshing. ideal for summer,but don’t get your hope too high on this one.Enjoyable as it is, it lacks complexity. I think it’s a good starting point for novice single malt drinkers, and should be great for a hot climate as ours.

@OJK

Nose, Taste, Finish and Balance are graded out of 2.5 each:

Nose: Apple and Dutch black liquorice are the first to greet, before introducing the marzipan candy and wet grass. Wafts of tobacco smoke are soon to follow, even shisha smoke of the peach variety. 2.0

Taste: A medium-bodied, oily sheet of pearled barley and malt, richly infused with oil-covered grape and peaty banana. A hint of spice offers a welcome counterpoint to the proceedings. 2.0

Finish: A calm surge of smoke and spice, as if one had literally taken the small coals from the Shisha pipe and put them on the palate, infused with the peach-flavoured tobacco smoke. 2.0

Balance: A complex dram, with plenty of refined layers of peat and spice to counterbalance the fruity malt. This is not a loud whisky, it doesn't demand your full and undivided attention, however it may well deserve it, or at least a good portion of it. A whisky of character, and one to be taken notice of. 2.0

@markjedi1

The anCnoc whisky is produced by the Knockdhu distillery, near Huntly in Aberdeenshire. Prior to it's mothballing of 1983, their spirit was an important component of the famous Haig blend. In 1993 the distillery was obtained and reopened by Inverhouse Distillers Ltd. They then started marketing their dram as single malt, under the label of anCnoc. This somewhat strange move was merely to make sure consumers would not confuse this signle malt with those of that other Speyside distillery, Knockando.

The nose is aromatic & soft with lots of honey, a bit of lime, liquorice and even cereals.

He starts off very sweet, but dries up fairly quickly. Reminds me a bit of fruitbeer (we have several in Belgium). At the end, it becomes a bit bitter.

The finish is short and very dry.

This is not at all a complex dram, but it doesn't pretend to be either. It's a good allrounder. A typical entry malt.

As it can be obtained for about 25 pounds, it's a good idea to have this in your cabinet at all times (as a daily dram or to serve to friends who are not yet introduced into the magical world of whisky).

Hey @markjedi1 did you see that @stu-r reviewed this today too connosr.com/reviews/an-cnoc/…

Very similar but nice to have both takes on it. I love this site!!!

Yep, that's the Power of Connosr :-) (Hey, I think JL should pay me a dram for this slogan, no?)

@Stu_R

Nose: Sweet Malt, delicate citrus and a touch of spice set against a dominant note of red apple. There is smoke also but it is dry...almost like the last embers of a coal fire, not at all peaty. In many ways quintessential Speyside but there is a characterful richness about it that is quite charming.

Feel: Silky and slightly light.

Taste: Intensely sweet, almost syrupy at first with a real hit of barley sugar before that dry smoke from the nose comes through. The smoke never overtakes the sweetness and they seem to sit side by side. The slightly tart apple so prominent on the nose is present but now drifts towards honey soaked pear. A subtle touch of peppery spice adds to the experience.

Finish: Still sweet with a little oak providing a contrast. This is not a long finish but the fruit carries right through.

I must confess that this AnCnoc is a real favourite of mine, when it comes to an easy drinking and very charming malt there are few better. It has all the sweet malty notes you would hope for but there is a subtle and distinctive complexity to it that, for me makes it one of the very best Speysiders. Much underrated.

Two An Cnoc 12 reviews on the same day, must be something in the water ;-)

connosr.com/reviews/an-cnoc/…

Indeed, and very different reviews in some ways. Its an odd one really. Ive spoken to many people who feel as I do about AnCnoc and many others who feel its nice but rather unremarkable.

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